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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:魏佑江 大小:Yb4n15xs64122KB 下载:JuxPoujq54042次
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日期:2020-08-08 05:41:32
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王维平

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  As he spoke he drew his keen blade of bronze, sharpened on bothsides, and with a loud cry sprang towards Ulysses, but Ulyssesinstantly shot an arrow into his breast that caught him by thenipple and fixed itself in his liver. He dropped his sword and felldoubled up over his table. The cup and all the meats went over on tothe ground as he smote the earth with his forehead in the agonies ofdeath, and he kicked the stool with his feet until his eyes wereclosed in darkness.
2.  Euryclea did as she was told, and bolted the women inside theirroom. Then Ulysses and his son made all haste to take the helmets,shields, and spears inside; and Minerva went before them with a goldlamp in her hand that shed a soft and brilliant radiance, whereonTelemachus said, "Father, my eyes behold a great marvel: the walls,with the rafters, crossbeams, and the supports on which they restare all aglow as with a flaming fire. Surely there is some god herewho has come down from heaven."
3.  When Ulysses heard this he put the lid on the chest and made it fastwith a bond that Circe had taught him. He had done so before anupper servant told him to come to the bath and wash himself. He wasvery glad of a warm bath, for he had had no one to wait upon himever since he left the house of Calypso, who as long as he remainedwith her had taken as good care of him as though he had been a god.When the servants had done washing and anointing him with oil, and hadgiven him a clean cloak and shirt, he left the bath room and joinedthe guests who were sitting over their wine. Lovely Nausicaa stoodby one of the bearing-posts supporting the roof if the cloister, andadmired him as she saw him pass. "Farewell stranger," said she, "donot forget me when you are safe at home again, for it is to me firstthat you owe a ransom for having saved your life."
4.  "'My friends,' said he, 'I have had a dream from heaven in my sleep.We are a long way from the ships; I wish some one would go down andtell Agamemnon to send us up more men at once.'
5.  Then Menelaus said, "All that you have been saying, my dear wife, istrue. I have travelled much, and have had much to do with heroes,but I have never seen such another man as Ulysses. What endurance too,and what courage he displayed within the wooden horse, wherein all thebravest of the Argives were lying in wait to bring death anddestruction upon the Trojans. At that moment you came up to us; somegod who wished well to the Trojans must have set you on to it andyou had Deiphobus with you. Three times did you go all round ourhiding place and pat it; you called our chiefs each by his own name,and mimicked all our wives -Diomed, Ulysses, and I from our seatsinside heard what a noise you made. Diomed and I could not make up ourminds whether to spring out then and there, or to answer you frominside, but Ulysses held us all in check, so we sat quite still, allexcept Anticlus, who was beginning to answer you, when Ulysses clappedhis two brawny hands over his mouth, and kept them there. It wasthis that saved us all, for he muzzled Anticlus till Minerva tookyou away again."
6.  "Nestor son of Neleus," answered Telemachus, "honour to theAchaean name, the Achaeans applaud Orestes and his name will livethrough all time for he has avenged his father nobly. Would thatheaven might grant me to do like vengeance on the insolence of thewicked suitors, who are ill treating me and plotting my ruin; butthe gods have no such happiness in store for me and for my father,so we must bear it as best we may."

计划指导

1.  "'Ulysses,' said I, 'this cold will be the death of me, for I haveno cloak; some god fooled me into setting off with nothing on but myshirt, and I do not know what to do.'
2.  Thus did they converse [and guests kept coming to the king'shouse. They brought sheep and wine, while their wives had put up breadfor them to take with them; so they were busy cooking their dinners inthe courts].
3.  They all held their peace till at last Agelaus son of Damastor said,"No one should take offence at what has just been said, nor gainsayit, for it is quite reasonable. Leave off, therefore, ill-treating thestranger, or any one else of the servants who are about the house; Iwould say, however, a friendly word to Telemachus and his mother,which I trust may commend itself to both. 'As long,' I would say,'as you had ground for hoping that Ulysses would one day come home, noone could complain of your waiting and suffering the suitors to bein your house. It would have been better that he should have returned,but it is now sufficiently clear that he will never do so; thereforetalk all this quietly over with your mother, and tell her to marry thebest man, and the one who makes her the most advantageous offer.Thus you will yourself be able to manage your own inheritance, andto eat and drink in peace, while your mother will look after someother man's house, not yours."'
4.  "These men hatched a plot against me that would have reduced me tothe very extreme of misery, for when the ship had got some way outfrom land they resolved on selling me as a slave. They stripped meof the shirt and cloak that I was wearing, and gave me instead thetattered old clouts in which you now see me; then, towardsnightfall, they reached the tilled lands of Ithaca, and there theybound me with a strong rope fast in the ship, while they went on shoreto get supper by the sea side. But the gods soon undid my bonds forme, and having drawn my rags over my head I slid down the rudderinto the sea, where I struck out and swam till I was well clear ofthem, and came ashore near a thick wood in which I lay concealed. Theywere very angry at my having escaped and went searching about forme, till at last they thought it was no further use and went back totheir ship. The gods, having hidden me thus easily, then took me toa good man's door- for it seems that I am not to die yet awhile."
5.  On this Eumaeus took his seat again, and when he had finished hisdinner he left the courts and the cloister with the men at table,and went back to his pigs. As for the suitors, they presently began toamuse themselves with singing and dancing, for it was now getting ontowards evening.
6.  "Meanwhile Eurylochus had been giving evil counsel to the men,'Listen to me,' said he, 'my poor comrades. All deaths are badenough but there is none so bad as famine. Why should not we drivein the best of these cows and offer them in sacrifice to theimmortal Rods? If we ever get back to Ithaca, we can build a finetemple to the sun-god and enrich it with every kind of ornament; if,however, he is determined to sink our ship out of revenge for thesehomed cattle, and the other gods are of the same mind, I for one wouldrather drink salt water once for all and have done with it, than bestarved to death by inches in such a desert island as this is.'

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1.  When Euryclea heard this she began to cry, and spoke fondly tohim, saying, "My dear child, what ever can have put such notion asthat into your head? Where in the world do you want to go to- you, whoare the one hope of the house? Your poor father is dead and gone insome foreign country nobody knows where, and as soon as your back isturned these wicked ones here will be scheming to get you put out ofthe way, and will share all your possessions among themselves; staywhere you are among your own people, and do not go wandering andworrying your life out on the barren ocean."
2.  "When I had nearly got back to the ship some god took pity upon mysolitude, and sent a fine antlered stag right into the middle of mypath. He was coming down his pasture in the forest to drink of theriver, for the heat of the sun drove him, and as he passed I struckhim in the middle of the back; the bronze point of the spear wentclean through him, and he lay groaning in the dust until the life wentout of him. Then I set my foot upon him, drew my spear from the wound,and laid it down; I also gathered rough grass and rushes and twistedthem into a fathom or so of good stout rope, with which I bound thefour feet of the noble creature together; having so done I hung himround my neck and walked back to the ship leaning upon my spear, forthe stag was much too big for me to be able to carry him on myshoulder, steadying him with one hand. As I threw him down in front ofthe ship, I called the men and spoke cheeringly man by man to eachof them. 'Look here my friends,' said I, 'we are not going to die somuch before our time after all, and at any rate we will not starveso long as we have got something to eat and drink on board.' On thisthey uncovered their heads upon the sea shore and admired the stag,for he was indeed a splendid fellow. Then, when they had feasted theireyes upon him sufficiently, they washed their hands and began tocook him for dinner.
3.  Then Telemachus spoke, "Shameless," he cried, "and insolent suitors,let us feast at our pleasure now, and let there be no brawling, for itis a rare thing to hear a man with such a divine voice as Phemius has;but in the morning meet me in full assembly that I may give you formalnotice to depart, and feast at one another's houses, turn and turnabout, at your own cost. If on the other hand you choose to persist inspunging upon one man, heaven help me, but Jove shall reckon withyou in full, and when you fall in my father's house there shall beno man to avenge you."
4.  "Then I took my sword of bronze and slung it over my shoulders; Ialso took my bow, and told Eurylochus to come back with me and show methe way. But he laid hold of me with both his hands and spokepiteously, saying, 'Sir, do not force me to go with you, but let mestay here, for I know you will not bring one of them back with you,nor even return alive yourself; let us rather see if we cannotescape at any rate with the few that are left us, for we may stillsave our lives.'
5.   Thus spoke Menelaus, and the heart of Telemachus yearned as hebethought him of his father. Tears fell from his eyes as he heardhim thus mentioned, so that he held his cloak before his face withboth hands. When Menelaus saw this he doubted whether to let himchoose his own time for speaking, or to ask him at once and findwhat it was all about.
6.  She said this to try him, but Ulysses was very angry and said,"Wife, I am much displeased at what you have just been saying. Who hasbeen taking my bed from the place in which I left it? He must havefound it a hard task, no matter how skilled a workman he was, unlesssome god came and helped him to shift it. There is no man living,however strong and in his prime, who could move it from its place, forit is a marvellous curiosity which I made with my very own hands.There was a young olive growing within the precincts of the house,in full vigour, and about as thick as a bearing-post. I built myroom round this with strong walls of stone and a roof to cover them,and I made the doors strong and well-fitting. Then I cut off the topboughs of the olive tree and left the stump standing. This I dressedroughly from the root upwards and then worked with carpenter's toolswell and skilfully, straightening my work by drawing a line on thewood, and making it into a bed-prop. I then bored a hole down themiddle, and made it the centre-post of my bed, at which I workedtill I had finished it, inlaying it with gold and silver; after this Istretched a hide of crimson leather from one side of it to theother. So you see I know all about it, and I desire to learn whetherit is still there, or whether any one has been removing it bycutting down the olive tree at its roots."

应用

1.  "'Stranger,' said she, 'I will make it all quite clear to you. Aboutthe time when the sun shall have reached mid heaven, the old man ofthe sea comes up from under the waves, heralded by the West windthat furs the water over his head. As soon as he has come up he liesdown, and goes to sleep in a great sea cave, where the seals-Halosydne's chickens as they call them- come up also from the greysea, and go to sleep in shoals all round him; and a very strong andfish-like smell do they bring with them. Early to-morrow morning Iwill take you to this place and will lay you in ambush. Pick out,therefore, the three best men you have in your fleet, and I willtell you all the tricks that the old man will play you.
2.  Another said, "I hope he may be no more successful in other thingsthan he is likely to be in stringing this bow."
3.  Then Melanthius the goatherd answered, "You ill-conditioned cur,what are you talking about? Some day or other I will put you onboard ship and take you to a foreign country, where I can sell you andpocket the money you will fetch. I wish I were as sure that Apollowould strike Telemachus dead this very day, or that the suitorswould kill him, as I am that Ulysses will never come home again."
4、  So saying he made a ship's cable fast to one of the bearing-poststhat supported the roof of the domed room, and secured it all aroundthe building, at a good height, lest any of the women's feet shouldtouch the ground; and as thrushes or doves beat against a net that hasbeen set for them in a thicket just as they were getting to theirnest, and a terrible fate awaits them, even so did the women have toput their heads in nooses one after the other and die mostmiserably. Their feet moved convulsively for a while, but not for verylong.
5、  "Your guest has not disgraced you, Telemachus. I did not miss what Iaimed at, and I was not long in stringing my bow. I am still strong,and not as the suitors twit me with being. Now, however, it is timefor the Achaeans to prepare supper while there is still daylight,and then otherwise to disport themselves with song and dance which arethe crowning ornaments of a banquet."

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  • 古驰 08-07

      "King Apollo," answered Mercury, "I only wish I might get thechance, though there were three times as many chains- and you mightlook on, all of you, gods and goddesses, but would sleep with her if Icould."

  • 白玛斯 08-07

      NOW when the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared,Alcinous and Ulysses both rose, and Alcinous led the way to thePhaecian place of assembly, which was near the ships. When they gotthere they sat down side by side on a seat of polished stone, whileMinerva took the form of one of Alcinous' servants, and went round thetown in order to help Ulysses to get home. She went up to thecitizens, man by man, and said, "Aldermen and town councillors ofthe Phaeacians, come to the assembly all of you and listen to thestranger who has just come off a long voyage to the house of KingAlcinous; he looks like an immortal god."

  • 庞亚轮 08-07

       "Stockman, and you swineherd, I have something in my mind which I amin doubt whether to say or no; but I think I will say it. Whatmanner of men would you be to stand by Ulysses, if some god shouldbring him back here all of a sudden? Say which you are disposed to do-to side with the suitors, or with Ulysses?"

  • 高丽万 08-07

      She then went upstairs to her own room, not alone, but attended byher maidens, and when there, she lamented her dear husband tillMinerva shed sweet sleep over her eyelids.

  • 许爱娟 08-06

    {  "Sit where you are, and eat your victuals in silence, or be offelsewhere," shouted Antinous. "If you say more I will have you draggedhand and foot through the courts, and the servants shall flay youalive."

  • 谢欣 08-05

      When she had thus made an end of praying, she handed the cup toTelemachus and he prayed likewise. By and by, when the outer meatswere roasted and had been taken off the spits, the carvers gaveevery man his portion and they all made an excellent dinner. As soonas they had had enough to eat and drink, Nestor, knight of Gerene,began to speak.}

  • 喻达娃 08-05

      Thus did they converse; meanwhile Melanthius the goatherd came up,for he too was bringing in his best goats for the suitors' dinner; andhe had two shepherds with him. They tied the goats up under thegatehouse, and then Melanthius began gibing at Ulysses. "Are you stillhere, stranger," said he, "to pester people by begging about thehouse? Why can you not go elsewhere? You and I shall not come to anunderstanding before we have given each other a taste of our fists.You beg without any sense of decency: are there not feasts elsewhereamong the Achaeans, as well as here?"

  • 袁福 08-05

      This frightened Irus still more, but they brought him into themiddle of the court, and the two men raised their hands to fight. ThenUlysses considered whether he should let drive so hard at him as tomake an end of him then and there, or whether he should give him alighter blow that should only knock him down; in the end he deemedit best to give the lighter blow for fear the Achaeans should begin tosuspect who he was. Then they began to fight, and Irus hit Ulysseson the right shoulder; but Ulysses gave Irus a blow on the neckunder the ear that broke in the bones of his skull, and the blood camegushing out of his mouth; he fell groaning in the dust, gnashing histeeth and kicking on the ground, but the suitors threw up theirhands and nearly died of laughter, as Ulysses caught hold of him bythe foot and dragged him into the outer court as far as thegate-house. There he propped him up against the wall and put his staffin his hands. "Sit here," said he, "and keep the dogs and pigs off;you are a pitiful creature, and if you try to make yourself king ofthe beggars any more you shall fare still worse."

  • 王杰秀 08-04

       While he was thus in two minds, Neptune sent a terrible great wavethat seemed to rear itself above his head till it broke right over theraft, which then went to pieces as though it were a heap of drychaff tossed about by a whirlwind. Ulysses got astride of one plankand rode upon it as if he were on horseback; he then took off theclothes Calypso had given him, bound Ino's veil under his arms, andplunged into the sea- meaning to swim on shore. King Neptune watchedhim as he did so, and wagged his head, muttering to himself andsaying, "'There now, swim up and down as you best can till you fall inwith well-to-do people. I do not think you will be able to say thatI have let you off too lightly." On this he lashed his horses anddrove to Aegae where his palace is.

  • 玉麦乡阿玛西 08-02

    {  "Thus did he pray, and Neptune heard his prayer. Then he picked up arock much larger than the first, swung it aloft and hurled it withprodigious force. It fell just short of the ship, but was within alittle of hitting the end of the rudder. The sea quaked as the rockfell into it, and the wash of the wave it raised drove us onwards onour way towards the shore of the island.

  • 邹小樱 08-02

      With these words he picked up the sword that Agelaus had droppedwhen he was being killed, and which was lying upon the ground. Then hestruck Leiodes on the back of his neck, so that his head fellrolling in the dust while he was yet speaking.

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