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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:李维 大小:WV6bpaDD70612KB 下载:IcDxfyhg27942次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:hINRkzJj13876条
日期:2020-08-10 05:46:24
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Then Alcinous said, "Stranger, it was very wrong of my daughternot to bring you on at once to my house along with the maids, seeingthat she was the first person whose aid you asked."
2.  AND NOW, as Dawn rose from her couch beside Tithonus- harbinger oflight alike to mortals and immortals- the gods met in council and withthem, Jove the lord of thunder, who is their king. Thereon Minervabegan to tell them of the many sufferings of Ulysses, for she pitiedhim away there in the house of the nymph Calypso.
3.  "'My dear nurse," said Penelope, "do not exult too confidentlyover all this. You know how delighted every one would be to seeUlysses come home- more particularly myself, and the son who hasbeen born to both of us; but what you tell me cannot be really true.It is some god who is angry with the suitors for their greatwickedness, and has made an end of them; for they respected no manin the whole world, neither rich nor poor, who came near them, whocame near them, and they have come to a bad end in consequence oftheir iniquity. Ulysses is dead far away from the Achaean land; hewill never return home again."
4.  So Ulysses slept in a bed placed in a room over the echoing gateway;but Alcinous lay in the inner part of the house, with the queen hiswife by his side.
5.  "Hush," answered Ulysses, "hold your peace and ask no questions, forthis is the manner of the gods. Get you to your bed, and leave me hereto talk with your mother and the maids. Your mother in her griefwill ask me all sorts of questions."
6.  Thus did they converse [and guests kept coming to the king'shouse. They brought sheep and wine, while their wives had put up breadfor them to take with them; so they were busy cooking their dinners inthe courts].

计划指导

1.  On this the old woman went out of the room to bid the maids go totheir mistress. In the meantime Minerva bethought her of anothermatter, and sent Penelope off into a sweet slumber; so she lay down onher couch and her limbs became heavy with sleep. Then the goddess shedgrace and beauty over her that all the Achaeans might admire her.She washed her face with the ambrosial loveliness that Venus wearswhen she goes dancing with the Graces; she made her taller and of amore commanding figure, while as for her complexion it was whiter thansawn ivory. When Minerva had done all this she went away, whereonthe maids came in from the women's room and woke Penelope with thesound of their talking.
2.  When Menelaus heard this he immediately told his wife and servantsto prepare a sufficient dinner from what there might be in thehouse. At this moment Eteoneus joined him, for he lived close by andhad just got up; so Menelaus told him to light the fire and cooksome meat, which he at once did. Then Menelaus went down into hisfragrant store room, not alone, but Helen went too, withMegapenthes. When he reached the place where the treasures of hishouse were kept, he selected a double cup, and told his sonMegapenthes to bring also a silver mixing-bowl. Meanwhile Helen wentto the chest where she kept the lovely dresses which she had made withher own hands, and took out one that was largest and mostbeautifully enriched with embroidery; it glittered like a star, andlay at the very bottom of the chest. Then they all came back throughthe house again till they got to Telemachus, and Menelaus said,"Telemachus, may Jove, the mighty husband of Juno, bring you safelyhome according to your desire. I will now present you with thefinest and most precious piece of plate in all my house. It is amixing-bowl of pure silver, except the rim, which is inlaid with gold,and it is the work of Vulcan. Phaedimus king of the Sidonians mademe a present of it in the course of a visit that I paid him while Iwas on my return home. I should like to give it to you."
3.  "I was trying to come on here, but the gods detained me in Egypt,for my hecatombs had not given them full satisfaction, and the godsare very strict about having their dues. Now off Egypt, about as faras a ship can sail in a day with a good stiff breeze behind her, thereis an island called Pharos- it has a good harbour from which vesselscan get out into open sea when they have taken in water- and thegods becalmed me twenty days without so much as a breath of fairwind to help me forward. We should have run clean out of provisionsand my men would have starved, if a goddess had not taken pity upon meand saved me in the person of Idothea, daughter to Proteus, the oldman of the sea, for she had taken a great fancy to me.
4.  "I was driven thence by foul winds for a space of nine days upon thesea, but on the tenth day we reached the land of the Lotus-eater,who live on a food that comes from a kind of flower. Here we landed totake in fresh water, and our crews got their mid-day meal on the shorenear the ships. When they had eaten and drunk I sent two of my companyto see what manner of men the people of the place might be, and theyhad a third man under them. They started at once, and went about amongthe Lotus-eaters, who did them no hurt, but gave them to eat of thelotus, which was so delicious that those who ate of it left off caringabout home, and did not even want to go back and say what had happenedto them, but were for staying and munching lotus with theLotus-eater without thinking further of their return; nevertheless,though they wept bitterly I forced them back to the ships and madethem fast under the benches. Then I told the rest to go on board atonce, lest any of them should taste of the lotus and leave off wantingto get home, so they took their places and smote the grey sea withtheir oars.
5.  Then Ulysses said, "Sir, I do not want to stay here; a beggar canalways do better in town than country, for any one who likes cangive him something. I am too old to care about remaining here at thebeck and call of a master. Therefore let this man do as you havejust told him, and take me to the town as soon as I have had a warm bythe fire, and the day has got a little heat in it. My clothes arewretchedly thin, and this frosty morning I shall be perished withcold, for you say the city is some way off."
6.  And Ulysses answered, "Nurse, you ought not to speak in that way;I am well able to form my own opinion about one and all of them;hold your tongue and leave everything to heaven."

推荐功能

1.  On this she led the way, and Ulysses followed in her steps; butnot one of the Phaecians could see him as he passed through the cityin the midst of them; for the great goddess Minerva in her good willtowards him had hidden him in a thick cloud of darkness. He admiredtheir harbours, ships, places of assembly, and the lofty walls ofthe city, which, with the palisade on top of them, were very striking,and when they reached the king's house Minerva said:
2.  "Suitors of the illustrious queen, listen that I may speak even as Iam minded. I appeal more especially to Eurymachus, and to Antinous whohas just spoken with so much reason. Cease shooting for the presentand leave the matter to the gods, but in the morning let heaven givevictory to whom it will. For the moment, however, give me the bow thatI may prove the power of my hands among you all, and see whether Istill have as much strength as I used to have, or whether travel andneglect have made an end of it."
3.  "Listen to me," he cried, "you suitors of Queen Penelope, that I mayspeak even as I am minded. A man knows neither ache nor pain if hegets hit while fighting for his money, or for his sheep or his cattle;and even so Antinous has hit me while in the service of my miserablebelly, which is always getting people into trouble. Still, if the poorhave gods and avenging deities at all, I pray them that Antinous maycome to a bad end before his marriage."
4.  Noemon then went back to his father's house, but Antinous andEurymachus were very angry. They told the others to leave off playing,and to come and sit down along with themselves. When they came,Antinous son of Eupeithes spoke in anger. His heart was black withrage, and his eyes flashed fire as he said:
5.   Immediately afterwards Ulysses came inside, looking like a poormiserable old beggar, leaning on his staff and with his clothes all inrags. He sat down upon the threshold of ash-wood just inside the doorsleading from the outer to the inner court, and against abearing-post of cypress-wood which the carpenter had skillfullyplaned, and had made to join truly with rule and line. Telemachus tooka whole loaf from the bread-basket, with as much meat as he could holdin his two hands, and said to Eumaeus, "Take this to the stranger, andtell him to go the round of the suitors, and beg from them; a beggarmust not be shamefaced."
6.  When Menelaus heard this he immediately told his wife and servantsto prepare a sufficient dinner from what there might be in thehouse. At this moment Eteoneus joined him, for he lived close by andhad just got up; so Menelaus told him to light the fire and cooksome meat, which he at once did. Then Menelaus went down into hisfragrant store room, not alone, but Helen went too, withMegapenthes. When he reached the place where the treasures of hishouse were kept, he selected a double cup, and told his sonMegapenthes to bring also a silver mixing-bowl. Meanwhile Helen wentto the chest where she kept the lovely dresses which she had made withher own hands, and took out one that was largest and mostbeautifully enriched with embroidery; it glittered like a star, andlay at the very bottom of the chest. Then they all came back throughthe house again till they got to Telemachus, and Menelaus said,"Telemachus, may Jove, the mighty husband of Juno, bring you safelyhome according to your desire. I will now present you with thefinest and most precious piece of plate in all my house. It is amixing-bowl of pure silver, except the rim, which is inlaid with gold,and it is the work of Vulcan. Phaedimus king of the Sidonians mademe a present of it in the course of a visit that I paid him while Iwas on my return home. I should like to give it to you."

应用

1.  Then spoke the aged hero Echeneus who was one of the oldest menamong them, "My friends," said he, "what our august queen has justsaid to us is both reasonable and to the purpose, therefore bepersuaded by it; but the decision whether in word or deed restsultimately with King Alcinous."
2.  Thereon he gathered his clouds together, grasped his trident,stirred it round in the sea, and roused the rage of every wind thatblows till earth, sea, and sky were hidden in cloud, and nightsprang forth out of the heavens. Winds from East, South, North, andWest fell upon him all at the same time, and a tremendous sea gotup, so that Ulysses' heart began to fail him. "Alas," he said tohimself in his dismay, "what ever will become of me? I am afraidCalypso was right when she said I should have trouble by sea beforeI got back home. It is all coming true. How black is Jove makingheaven with his clouds, and what a sea the winds are raising fromevery quarter at once. I am now safe to perish. Blest and thrice blestwere those Danaans who fell before Troy in the cause of the sons ofAtreus. Would that had been killed on the day when the Trojans werepressing me so sorely about the dead body of Achilles, for then Ishould have had due burial and the Achaeans would have honoured myname; but now it seems that I shall come to a most pitiable end."
3.  Then with both hands he took what Telemachus had sent him, andlaid it on the dirty old wallet at his feet. He went on eating itwhile the bard was singing, and had just finished his dinner as heleft off. The suitors applauded the bard, whereon Minerva went up toUlysses and prompted him to beg pieces of bread from each one of thesuitors, that he might see what kind of people they were, and tell thegood from the bad; but come what might she was not going to save asingle one of them. Ulysses, therefore, went on his round, goingfrom left to right, and stretched out his hands to beg as though hewere a real beggar. Some of them pitied him, and were curious abouthim, asking one another who he was and where he came from; whereon thegoatherd Melanthius said, "Suitors of my noble mistress, I can tellyou something about him, for I have seen him before. The swineherdbrought him here, but I know nothing about the man himself, norwhere he comes from."
4、  "We lit a fire, offered some of the cheeses in sacrifice, ate othersof them, and then sat waiting till the Cyclops should come in with hissheep. When he came, he brought in with him a huge load of dryfirewood to light the fire for his supper, and this he flung with sucha noise on to the floor of his cave that we hid ourselves for fearat the far end of the cavern. Meanwhile he drove all the ewesinside, as well as the she-goats that he was going to milk, leavingthe males, both rams and he-goats, outside in the yards. Then herolled a huge stone to the mouth of the cave- so huge that two andtwenty strong four-wheeled waggons would not be enough to draw it fromits place against the doorway. When he had so done he sat down andmilked his ewes and goats, all in due course, and then let each ofthem have her own young. He curdled half the milk and set it asidein wicker strainers, but the other half he poured into bowls that hemight drink it for his supper. When he had got through with all hiswork, he lit the fire, and then caught sight of us, whereon he said:
5、  "Ulysses," said he, "now that you have reached my house I doubtnot you will get home without further misadventure no matter howmuch you have suffered in the past. To you others, however, who comehere night after night to drink my choicest wine and listen to mybard, I would insist as follows. Our guest has already packed up theclothes, wrought gold, and other valuables which you have broughtfor his acceptance; let us now, therefore, present him further, eachone of us, with a large tripod and a cauldron. We will recoupourselves by the levy of a general rate; for private individualscannot be expected to bear the burden of such a handsome present."

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网友评论(9e6ECkXN30274))

  • 李光铸 08-09

      Thus spoke Menelaus, and the heart of Telemachus yearned as hebethought him of his father. Tears fell from his eyes as he heardhim thus mentioned, so that he held his cloak before his face withboth hands. When Menelaus saw this he doubted whether to let himchoose his own time for speaking, or to ask him at once and findwhat it was all about.

  • 苏美 08-09

      As he spoke he went inside the buildings to the cloister where thesuitors were, but Argos died as soon as he had recognized his master.

  • 朱小葭 08-09

       Then Minerva bethought her of another matter. When she deemed thatUlysses had had both of his wife and of repose, she badegold-enthroned Dawn rise out of Oceanus that she might shed light uponmankind. On this, Ulysses rose from his comfortable bed and said toPenelope, "Wife, we have both of us had our full share of troubles,you, here, in lamenting my absence, and I in being prevented fromgetting home though I was longing all the time to do so. Now, however,that we have at last come together, take care of the property thatis in the house. As for the sheep and goats which the wicked suitorshave eaten, I will take many myself by force from other people, andwill compel the Achaeans to make good the rest till they shall havefilled all my yards. I am now going to the wooded lands out in thecountry to see my father who has so long been grieved on my account,and to yourself I will give these instructions, though you have littleneed of them. At sunrise it will at once get abroad that I have beenkilling the suitors; go upstairs, therefore, and stay there withyour women. See nobody and ask no questions."

  • 张鹏翔 08-09

      Ulysses answered, "Madam, I have foresworn rugs and blankets fromthe day that I left the snowy ranges of Crete to go on shipboard. Iwill lie as I have lain on many a sleepless night hitherto. Nightafter night have I passed in any rough sleeping place, and waitedfor morning. Nor, again, do I like having my feet washed; I shallnot let any of the young hussies about your house touch my feet;but, if you have any old and respectable woman who has gone through asmuch trouble as I have, I will allow her to wash them."

  • 徐元锋 08-08

    {  "We are speaking god and goddess to one another, one another, andyou ask me why I have come here, and I will tell you truly as youwould have me do. Jove sent me; it was no doing of mine; who couldpossibly want to come all this way over the sea where there are nocities full of people to offer me sacrifices or choice hecatombs?Nevertheless I had to come, for none of us other gods can crossJove, nor transgress his orders. He says that you have here the mostill-starred of alf those who fought nine years before the city of KingPriam and sailed home in the tenth year after having sacked it. Ontheir way home they sinned against Minerva, who raised both wind andwaves against them, so that all his brave companions perished, andhe alone was carried hither by wind and tide. Jove says that you areto let this by man go at once, for it is decreed that he shall notperish here, far from his own people, but shall return to his houseand country and see his friends again."

  • 艾尼瓦尔·依 08-07

      She was nothing loth, so they went to the couch to take theirrest, whereon they were caught in the toils which cunning Vulcan hadspread for them, and could neither get up nor stir hand or foot, butfound too late that they were in a trap. Then Vulcan came up tothem, for he had turned back before reaching Lemnos, when his scoutthe sun told him what was going on. He was in a furious passion, andstood in the vestibule making a dreadful noise as he shouted to allthe gods.}

  • 鹿峰 08-07

      "On this the ghost of Teiresias went back to the house of Hades, forhis prophecyings had now been spoken, but I sat still where I wasuntil my mother came up and tasted the blood. Then she knew me at onceand spoke fondly to me, saying, 'My son, how did you come down to thisabode of darkness while you are still alive? It is a hard thing forthe living to see these places, for between us and them there aregreat and terrible waters, and there is Oceanus, which no man cancross on foot, but he must have a good ship to take him. Are you allthis time trying to find your way home from Troy, and have you neveryet got back to Ithaca nor seen your wife in your own house?'

  • 天武天皇 08-07

      Then Ulysses said: "Pray, Alcinous, do not take any such notion intoyour head. I have nothing of the immortal about me, neither in bodynor mind, and most resemble those among you who are the mostafflicted. Indeed, were I to tell you all that heaven has seen fitto lay upon me, you would say that I was still worse off than theyare. Nevertheless, let me sup in spite of sorrow, for an empty stomachis a very importunate thing, and thrusts itself on a man's notice nomatter how dire is his distress. I am in great trouble, yet it insiststhat I shall eat and drink, bids me lay aside all memory of my sorrowsand dwell only on the due replenishing of itself. As for yourselves,do as you propose, and at break of day set about helping me to gethome. I shall be content to die if I may first once more behold myproperty, my bondsmen, and all the greatness of my house."

  • 杨昱 08-06

       "First observe this scar," answered Ulysses, "which I got from aboar's tusk when I was hunting on Mount Parnassus. You and my motherhad sent me to Autolycus, my mother's father, to receive thepresents which when he was over here he had promised to give me.Furthermore I will point out to you the trees in the vineyard whichyou gave me, and I asked you all about them as I followed you roundthe garden. We went over them all, and you told me their names andwhat they all were. You gave me thirteen pear trees, ten appletrees, and forty fig trees; you also said you would give me fifty rowsof vines; there was corn planted between each row, and they yieldgrapes of every kind when the heat of heaven has been laid heavyupon them."

  • 赵寅成 08-04

    {  On this Telemachus came forward and said, "Sirs, are you mad? Canyou not carry your meat and your liquor decently? Some evil spirit haspossessed you. I do not wish to drive any of you away, but you havehad your suppers, and the sooner you all go home to bed the better."

  • 考彭斯 08-04

      "Mother," answered Telemachus, "let the bard sing what he has a mindto; bards do not make the ills they sing of; it is Jove, not they, whomakes them, and who sends weal or woe upon mankind according to hisown good pleasure. This fellow means no harm by singing theill-fated return of the Danaans, for people always applaud thelatest songs most warmly. Make up your mind to it and bear it; Ulyssesis not the only man who never came back from Troy, but many anotherwent down as well as he. Go, then, within the house and busyyourself with your daily duties, your loom, your distaff, and theordering of your servants; for speech is man's matter, and mineabove all others- for it is I who am master here."

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