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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:马娅 大小:3GJOFSSF62506KB 下载:dCasEZ3f41894次
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日期:2020-08-09 23:35:28
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劳恩斯

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  But if all other devises els had failed, my pen was and is myprevayling Champion, where-with I would have written such and somany strange matters, concerning you in your very dearestreputation; that you should have curst the houre of your conception,and wisht your birth had bin abortive. The powers of the pen are toomany and mighty, wherof such weake wits as have made no experience,are the lesse able to use any relation. I sweare to you Lady, by mybest hopes, that this revenge which (perhappes) you esteeme greatand dishonourable, is no way compareable to the wounding Lines of aPenne, which can carracter downe so infinite infamies (yet none butguilty and true taxations) as will make your owne hands immediateinstruments, to teare the eyes from forth your head, and so bequeathyour after dayes unto perpetuall darkenesse.
2.  Away went the Clearke home with the Cloake, and told Sir Simonwhat she had said, whereto he replyed. If I must make use of herMorter no more; I will not trust her with the keeping of my Cloake,for feare it goe to gage indeed.
3.  Mistresse shallow-braine, being swolne big with this wind, like anempty bladder; conceived no small pride in hearing these words,constantly crediting them to be true, and therefore thus answered. DidI not tel you Father Albert, that my beauty was celestiall? But Isweare by my beauty, notwithstanding your idle passed arrogancy, Iam heartily sorry for your so severe correction; which that it mayno more be inflicted on you, I do freely pardon you; yet with thisproviso, that you tell me what the God else saide unto you; wheretoFryar Albert thus replyed. Madam, seeing you have so graciouslyvouchsafed to pardon me, I will thankfully tell you all: but youmust be very carefull and respective, that whatsoever I shallreveale unto you, must so closely be concealed, as no livingcreature in the World may know it; for you are the onely happy Ladynow living, and that happinesse relleth on your silence andsecrecie: with solemne vowes and protestations she sealed up hermany promises, and then the Fryar thus proceeded.
4.  Constance hearing that she spake the Latine language so well;desired to know what she was. Whereto the old woman thus answered:Gentlewoman (quoth she) I am of Trapanum, named Carapresa, and am aservant in this Countrey to certaine Christian Fishermen. The youngMaiden (albeit she was very full of sorrow) hearing her name to beCarapresa, conceived it as a good augury to her selfe, and that shehad heard the name before, although she knew not what occasionshould move her thus to do. Now began her hopes to quicken againe, andyet she could not relie upon what ground; nor was she so desirous ofdeath as before, but made more precious estimation of her life, andwithout any further declaration of her selfe or Countrey, sheentreated the good woman (even for charities sake) to take pitty onher youth, and helpe her with such good advice, to prevent allinjuries which might happen to her, in such a solitary wofullcondition.
5.  But in the succeeding days he rose up many times; and the girl,always disposing herself to subdue him, began to take pleasure inthe exercise, and to say such things as: "I see now the truth ofwhat the good folk in Capsa told me, that serving God is a delight;for I never remember doing anything that gave me as much joy andpleasure as this putting the Devil in Hell. So I think the peoplewho spend their time otherwise than in serving God must be veryfoolish."
6.  Sometime heeretofore, there dwelt in our Cittie, a Knight namedSignior Theobaldo, who (according as some report) issued from theFamily of Lamberti, but others derive him of the Agolanti; guiding(perhaps) their opinion heerein, more from the traine of Children,belonging to the saide Theobaldo (evermore equall to that of theAgolanti) then any other matter else. But setting aside from whichof these two houses he came, I say, that in his time he was a verywealthy Knight, and had three sonnes; the first being namedLamberto, the second Theobaldo, and the third Agolanto, all goodly andgracefull youths: howbeit, the eldest had not compleated eighteeneyeares, when Signior Theobaldo the Father deceased, who left themall his goods and inheritances. And they, seeing themselves rich inready monies and revennewes, without any other governement thentheir owne voluntary disposition, kept no restraint upon theirexpences, but maintained many servants, and store of unvalewableHorses, beside Hawkes and Hounds, with open house for all commers; andnot onely all delights else fit for Gentlemen, but what vanitiesbeside best agreed with their wanton and youthfull appetites.

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1.  Upon this fatall and unfortunate day to Madame Helena, it chanced,that a Clowne or Countrey Peazant belonging to her Farme or Dairyhouse, having two of his young Heyfers wandred astray, and helabouring in diligent search to finde them: within a while after theSchollers departure, came to seeke them in Woods about the Tower, and,notwithstanding all his crying and calling for his beasts, yet heheard the Ladies greevous moanes and lamentations. Wherefore, he cryedout so lowd as he could, saying: Who is it that mourneth so aloft onthe Tower? Full well she knew the voyce of her peazant, andtherefore called unto him, and sayd in this maner.
2.  Can I never finde
3.  Marke now, how quickly misery can receive comfort, upon so poore andsilly a question; for Guion began to elevate his dejected countenance,and looking on the Admirall, returned him this answer. Sir, heretoforeI have bene the man which you speake of; but now, both that name andman must die with me. What misfortune (said the Admirall) hath thusunkindly crost thee? Love (answered Guion) and the Kingsdispleasure. Then the Admirall would needs know the whole history atlarge, which briefly was related to him, and having heard how allhad happened; as he was turning his Horse to ride away thence, Guioncalled to him, saying, Good my Lord, entreat one favour for me, ifpossibly it may be. What is that? replyed the Admirall. You see Sir(quoth Guior) that I am very shortly to breathe my last; all the gracewhich I do most humbly entreat, is, that as I am here with this chasteVirgin, (whom I honour and love beyond my life) and miserably boundbacke to backe: our faces may be turned each to other, to the end,that when the fire shall finish my life, by looking on her, my soulemay take her flight in full felicity. The Admirall smiling, said; Iwill do for thee what I can, and (perhaps) thou mayest so long lookeon her, as thou wilt be weary, and desire to looke off her.
4.  The two Brothers, whose pass exceeded their best means forsupport, perceiving some hope how to enjoy their loves; desired nolong time of deliberation, or greatly disputed with their thoughtswhat was best to be done: but readily replyed, that let happen anydanger whatsoever, they would joyne with him in this determination,and he should partake with them in their wealthiest fortunes. AfterRestagnone had heard their answer, within some few dayes following, hewent to confer with Ninetta, which was no easie matter for him tocompasse. Neverthelesse, opportunity proved so favourable to him, thatmeeting with her at a private place appointed, he discoursed at large,what had passed betweene him and the other two young Gentlemen,maintaining the same with many good reasons, to have her like andallow of the enterprize. Which although (for a while) he could veryhardly doe; yet, in regard shee had more desire then power, withoutsuspition to be daily in his company, she thus answered. My heartschosen friend, I cannot any way mislike your advice, and will takesuch order with my Sisters, that they shal agree to our resolution.Let it therefore be your charge, that you and the rest make everything ready, to depart from hence so soone, as with best convenientmeanes we may be enabled.
5.  Questionlesse, the Kings Novell not so much exceed the rest inlength, but it proved as sing to the whole assembly, past with theirgenerall approbation, till Dioneus (in a merry jesting humour) said.The plaine honest simple man, that stood holding the Candle, to seethe setting on of his Mules tayle; deserved two penny-worth of morepraise, then all our applauding of Signior Thorello: And knowinghimselfe to bee left for the last speaker, thus he began.
6.  SUCH HUSBANDS, AS LEAVE THEM ALONE TO THEIR OWNE DISPOSITION

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1.  Every one in this honest and gracious assembly, most highlycommended the Novell re-counted by the Queene: but especially Dioneus,who remained to finish that dayes pleasure with his owne Discourse,and after many praises of the former tale were past, thus he began.Faire Ladies, part of the Queenes Novell hath made an alteration of myminde, from that which I intended to proceede next withall, andtherfore I will report another. I cannot forget the unmanlyindiscretion of Bernardo, but much more the base arrogance ofAmbroginolo, how justly deserved shame fell upon him, as well it mayhappen to all other, that are so vile in their owne opinions, as heapparantly approved himselfe to be. For, as men wander abroad in theworld, according to their occasions in diversity of Countries andobservations of the peoples behaviour; so are their humours asvariously transported. And if they finde women wantonly disposedabroade, the like judgement they give of their Wives at home; as ifthey had never knowne their birth and breeding, or made proofe oftheir loyall carriage towards them. Wherefore, the Tale that I purposeto relate, will likewise condemne all the like kind of men, but moreespecially such as thinke themselves endued with more strength thenNature meant to bestow on them, foolishly beleeving, that they cancover their owne defects by fabulous demonstrations, and thinking tofashion other of their owne complexions, that are meerely strangers tosuch grosse follies.Know then, that there lived in Pisa (some hundred yeeres beforeTuscany and Liguria embraced the Christian faith) a judge betterstored with wisedome and ingenuity, then corporall abilities of thebody, named Signior Ricciardo di Cinzica. He being more then halfeperswaded, that hee could content a woman with such satisfaction ashee daily bestowed on his studies, being a widdower, and extraordinarywealthy, laboured with no meane paines, to enjoy a faire and youthfullwife in marriage: both which qualities hee should much rather haveavoyded, if he could have ministred as good counsell to himselfe, ashe did to others, resorting to him for advice. Upon this his amorousand diligent inquisition, it came so to passe, that a worthyGentlewoman, called Bertolomea, one of the fairest and choisest yongmaids in Pisa, whose youth did hardly agree with his age; but muck wasthe motive of this mariage, and no expectation of mutuall contentment.The Judge being married, and the Bride brought solemnly home to hishouse, we need make no question of brave cheare and banquetting,well furnished by their friends on either side: other matters were nowhammering in the judges head, for thogh he could please all hisClients with counsel, yet now such a suit was commenced againsthimselfe, and in Beauties Court of continuall requests, that the Judgefailing in plea for his own defence, was often nonsuited by lack ofanswer; yet he wanted not good wines, drugs, and all sorts ofrestoratives to comfort the heart, and encrease good blood: but allavailed not.
2.  But why do I trouble you with the repetition of so many countries? Icoasted on still, after I had past Saint Georges Arme, into Truffia,and then into Buffia which are Countries much inhabited, and withgreat people. From thence I went into the Land of Lying, where I foundstore of the Brethren of our Religion, and many other beside, whoshunned all paine and labour, onely for the love of God, and caredas little, for the paines and travailes which others tooke, exceptsome benefit arised thereby to them; nor spend they any money inthis Country, but such as is without stampe. Thence I went into theLand of Abruzzi, where the men and women goe in Galoches over theMountaines, and make them garments of their Swines guts. Not farrefrom thence, I found people, that carried bread in their staves, andwine in Satchels, when parting from them, I arrived among theMountaines of Bacchus, where all the waters run downe with a deepefall, and in short time, I went on so far, that I found my selfe to bein India Pastinaca; where I swear to you by the holy habit which Iweare on my body, that I saw Serpents Bye, things incredible, and suchas were never seene before.But because I would be loth to lye, so soone as I departed thence,I met with Maso de Saggio, who was a great Merchant there, and whomI found cracking Nuts, and selling Cockles by retale. Neverthelesse,al this while I could not finde what I sought for, and therefore I wasto passe from hence by water, if I intended to travaile thither, andso into the Holy Land, where coole fresh bread is sold for fourepence, and the hot is given away for nothing. There I found thevenerable Father (blame me not I beseech you) the most woorthiePatriarch of Jerusalem, who for the reverence due to the habite Iweare, and love to our Lord Baron Saint Anthony, would have me tosee al the holy Reliques, which he had there under his charge:wherof there were so many, as if I should recount them all to you, Inever could come to a conclusion. But yet not to leave youdiscomforted, I will relate some few of them to you. First of all,he shewed me the finger of the holy Ghost, so whole and perfect, asever it was. Next, the nose of the Cherubin, which appeared to SaintFrances; with the payring of the naile of a Seraphin; and one of theribbes of Verbum caro, fastened to one of the Windowes' covered withthe holy garments of the Catholique Faith. Then he tooke me into adarke Chappel, where he shewed me divers beames of the Starre thatappeared to the three Kings in the East. Also a Violl of SaintMichaels sweate, when he combatted with the divell: And the jaw-boneof dead Lazarus, with many other precious things beside. And because Iwas liberall to him, giving him two of the Plaines of Monte Morello,in the Vulgare Edition, and some of the Chapters del Caprezio, whichhe had long laboured in search of; he bestowed on me some of hisReliques. First, he gave me one of the eye-teeth of Santa Crux; anda litle Violl, filled with some part of the sound of those Belles,which hung in the sumptuous Temple of Salomon. Next, he gave mee theFeather of the Phoenix, which was with Noah in the Arke, as before Itold you. And one of the Woodden Pattens, which the good Saint Gerrardde Magnavilla used to weare in his travailes, and which I gave (notlong since) to Gerrardo di Bousy at Florence, where it is respectedwith much devotion. Moreover, he gave me a few of those Coales,wherwith the Phoenix of Noah was roasted; all which things I broughtaway thence with me. Now, most true it is, that my Superiour wouldnever suffer mee to shew them any where, untill he was faithfullycertified, whether they were the same precious Reliques, or no. Butperceyving by sundrie Myracles which they have wrought, and Letters ofsufficient credence receyved from the reverend Patriarch, that allis true, he hath graunted me permission to them, and because I woldnot trust any one with matters of such moment, I my selfe brought themhither with me. Now I must tell you, that the Feather of the samePhoenix, I conveyed into a small Cabinet or Casket, because itshould not be bent or broken. And the Coales wherewith the saidPhoenix was roasted, I put into another Casket, in all respects solike to the former, that many times I have taken one for another. Asnow at this instant it hath bin my fortune: for, imagining that Ibrought the Casket with the feather, I mistooke my self, and broughtthe other with the coales. Wherein doubtles I have not offended,because I am certaine, that we of our Order do not any thing, but itis ordred by divine direction, and our blessed Patron the LordeBaron Saint Anthony. And so much the rather, because about a senighthence, the Feast of Saint Anthony is to bee solemnized, against thepreparation whereof, and to kindle your zeale with the greaterfervencie: he put the Casket with the Coales into my hand, meaning,let you see the Feather, at some more fitting season. And therefore myblessed Sonnes and Daughters, put off your Bonnets, and come hitherwith devotion to looke upon them. But first let me tell you, whosoeveris marked by any of these Coales, with the signe of the Crosse: heor she shal live all this yeare happily, and no fire whatsoevershall come neere to touch or hurt them. So, singing a solemneAntheme in the praise of S. Anthony, he unveyled the Casket, andshewed the Coales openly.The simple multitude, having (with great admiration and reverence)a long while beheld them, they thronged in crouds to Fryar Onyon,giving him farre greater offerings, then before they had, andentreating him to marke them each after other. Whereupon, he takingthe coales in his hand, began to marke their garments of white, andthe veyles on the Womens heads, with Crosses of no meane extendure:affirming to them, that the more the Coales wasted with making thosegreat crosses, the more they still encreased in the Casket, as oftenbefore hee had made triall.
3.  Meeting with a Merchant, that bought his great Ship of him; with themoney made thereof, and also his other Merchandizes, hee purchasedanother, being a lighter vessell, apt and proper for the use of aPirate, arming and furnishing it in ample manner, for roving androbbing upon the Seas. Thus hee began to make other mens goods hisowne, especially from the Turkes he tooke much wealth, Fortune beingalwayes therein so favourable to him, that hee could never compassethe like by trading. So that, within the space of one yeare, hee hadrobd and taken so many Gallies from the Turke; that he foundhimselfe well recovered, not onely of all his losses by Merchandize,but likewise his wealth was wholly redoubled. Finding his losses to bevery liberally requited, and having now sufficient, it were folly tohazard a second fall; wherefore, conferring with his owne thoughts,and finding that he had enough, and needed not to covet after more: hefully concluded, now to returne home to his owne house againe, andlive upon his goods thus gotten.
4.  This so sodaine dexterity of wit in Isabella, related in veriemodest manner by Madame Pampinea, was not onely admired by all thecompany; but likewise passed with as generall approbation. But yetMadam Philomena (whom the King had commanded next to succeede)peremptorily sayde. Worthy Ladies, if I am not deceived; I intend totell you another Tale presently; as much to be commended as the last.
5.   ARGUMENTS DO CONCERNE SUCH PERSONS, AS EITHER BY WAY OF
6.  Having lighted many Torches, the Abbot and his Monkes entred withthe Sexton into the Church, where they beheld the wonderful richebedde, and the Knight lying fast asleepe in it. While they stood allin amazement, not daring to approach neere the bedde, whereon lay suchcostly jewells: it chanced that Signior Thorello awaked, andbreathed forth a vehement sigh. The Monkes and the Abbot seeing him tostirre, ranne all away in feare, crying aloud, God and S. Peter defendus.

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1.  Manutio, more then contented, to carry such glad tydings toLisana; without staying in any place, and taking his Lute also withhim, went to the Apothecaries house, where speaking alone with theMaide: he told her what he had done, and afterward sung the song toher, in as excellent manner as he had done before, wherein Lisanaconceived such joy and contentment, as even in the very same moment,it was observed by apparant signes, that the violence of her fitsforsooke her, and health began to get the upper hand of them. SO,without suffering any one in the house to know it, or by the leastmeanes to suspect it; she comforted her selfe till the evening, inexpectation of her Soveraignes arrivall.
2.  Striguario made no delaying of the matter, but got himselfe closelieunder the Fat, and Peronella opening the doore for her husbandsenterance, with a frowning countenance, spake thus unto him. Whatmeaneth this so early returning home againe this morning? Itseemeth, thou intendest to do nothing to day, having brought backe thytooles in thy hands? If such be thine intent, how shall we live? Whereshal we have bread to fill our bellies? Dooest thou thinke, that Iwill suffer thee to pawne my gowne, and other poore garments, asheeretofore thou hast done? I that card and spinne both night and day,till I have worne the flesh from my fingers; yet all will hardly findeoyle to maintaine our Lampe. Husband, husband, there is not oneneighbour dwelling by us, but makes a mockerie of me, and tels meplainly, that I may be ashamed to drudge and moyle as I do;wondering not a little, how I am able to endure it; and thou returnesthome with thy hands in thy hose, as if thou hadst no worke at all todo this day.
3.  AFTER IT IS CONSTANTLY SETLED BEFORE: WITH OTHER
4、  This Gentleman, knowing himselfe no lesse wealthy then Nathan, andenviously repining at his vertue and liberality, determined in hismind, to dim and obscure the others bright splendor, by makinghimselfe farre more famous. And having built a Palace answerable tothat of Nathans, with like windings of gates, and welcom inscriptions;he beganne to extend immeasurable courtesies, unto all such as weredisposed to visite him: so that (in a short while) hee grew veryfamous in infinite places. It chanced on a day, as Mithridanes sateall alone within the goodly Court of his Pallace: a poore woman entredat one of the gates, craving an almes of him, which she had; andreturned in againe at a second gate, comming also to him, and had asecond almes; continuing so still a dozen times; but at the thirteenthreturning, Mithridanes saide to her: Good Woman, you goe and come veryoften, and still you are served with almes. When the old Woman heardthese words, she said. O the liberality of Nathan! How honourableand wonderfull is that? I have past through two and thirty gates ofhis Palace, even such as are here, and at every one I receyved analmes, without any knowledgement taken of me, either by him, or any ofhis followers: and heere I have past but through thirteene gates,and am there both acknowledged and taken. Farewell to this house,for I never meane to visit it any more; with which words shee departedthence, and never after came thither againe.
5、  I heard a Nimph that sate alone,

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  • 王晟彪 08-08

      Ravenna being a very ancient City in Romania, there dwelt sometime agreat number of worthy Gentlemen, among whom I am to speake of onemore especially, named Anastasio, descended from the Family of theHonesti, who by the death of his Father, and an Unckle of his, wasleft extraordinarily abounding in riches, and growing to yearesfitting for marriage, (as young Gallants are easily apt enough todo) he became enamored of a very bountifull Gentlewoman, who wasDaughter to Signior Paulo Traversario, one of the most ancient andnoble Families in all the Countrey. Nor made he any doubt, but byhis meanes and industrious endeavour, to derive affection from heragaine; for he carried himselfe like a brave-minded Gentleman,liberall in his expences, honest and affable in all his actions, whichcommonly are the true notes of a good nature, and highly to becommended in any man. But, howsoever Fortune became his enemy, theselaudable parts of manhood did not any way friend him, but ratherappeared hurtfull to himselfe: so cruell, unkind, and almost meerelysavage did she shew her selfe to him; perhaps in pride of her singularbeauty, or presuming on her nobility by birth, both which are ratherblemishes, then ornaments in a woman, especially when they be abused.

  • 綦翠华 08-08

      A physitians wife laide a Lover of her Maides (supposing him to bedead) in a Chest, by reason that he had drunke Water, which usuallywas given to procure a sleepy entrancing. Two Lombard usurers,stealing the Chest, in hope of a rich booty, carryed it into theirowne house, where afterward the man awaking, was apprehended for aTheefe. The Chamber-maide to the Physitians wife, going before thebench of Justice, accuseth her selfe for putting the imagined deadbody into the Chest, by which meanes he escapeth hanging. And thetheeves which stole away the Chest, were condemned to pay a greatsumme of money.

  • 王晓林 08-08

       In hope that gracious time will come at length,

  • 程咬金 08-08

      After the Song was past, divers other were sung beside, and it nowdrawing wel-neere midnight, by the Kings command, they all went tobed. And when new day appeared, and all the world awaked out ofsleepe, the Master of the Houshold having sent away the carriages;they returned (under the conduct of their discreet King) toFlorence, where the three Gentlemen left the seven Ladies at theChurch of Santa Maria Novella, from whence they went with them atthe first. And having parted with kinde salutations, the Gentlemenwent whether themselves best pleased, and the Ladies repaired hometo their houses.

  • 黄白 08-07

    {  WHEREIN IS COVERTLY GIVEN TO UNDERSTAND, THAT HOWSOEVER A PRINCE

  • 李福成 08-06

      The Mistresse understanding now apparantly, the full effect of thewhole businesse, and in what manner it had bene carried, revealed tothe Maide her husbands speeches, concerning the glasse of sleepieWater, which was the onely engine of all this trouble, clearlyacquitting Ruggiero of the robbery, howsoever (in desparate fury,and to make an end of a life so contemptible) he had wrongfullyaccused himselfe. And notwithstanding this his hard fortune, whichhath made him much more infamous then before, in all the dissolutebehaviour of his life: yet it could not quaile her affection towardshim; but being loath he should dye for some other mans offence, andhoping his future reformation; she fell on her knees before herMistresse, and (drowned in her teares) most earnestly entreated her,to advise her with some such happy course, as might be the safety ofpoore Ruggieroes life. Mistresse Doctor, affecting her Maidedearely, and plainely perceiving, that no disastrous fortunewhatsoever, could alter her love to condemned Ruggiero; hoping thebest hereafter, as the Maide her selfe did, and willing to save liferather then suffer it to be lost without just cause, she directedher in such discreet manner, as you will better conceive by thesuccesse.}

  • 肖凌 08-06

      Poore Simonida, sighing and sorrowing for her deere loves losse, and(perhappes) not meanly terrified, with the strict infliction oftorment so severely urged and followed by Strambo and the reststanding dumb still, without answering so much as one word; by tastingof the same Sage, fell downe dead by the bed, even by the likeaccident Pasquino formerly did, to the admirable astonishment of allthere present.

  • 方中英 08-06

      Indeede you say true Unckle, I am come home verie earely, because,since the day of my birth, I never saw a City so pestered withunhandsome people, both men and women, and worse this high Holyday,then ever I did observe before. I walked thorow some store ofstreetes, and I could not see one proper man: and as for the women,they are the most mishapen and ugly creatures, that, if God had mademe such an one, I should be sory that ever I was borne. And being nolonger able to endure such unpleasing sights; you wil not thinke(Unckle) in what an anger I am come home. Fresco, to whome thesestinking qualities of his Neece seemed so unsufferable, that hee couldnot (with patience) endure them any longer, thus short and quickelyanswered. Francesca, if all people of our Citie (both men and women)be so odious in thy eyes, and offensive to thy nose, as thou hastoften reported to me: bee advised then by my counsell. Stay stil athome, and look upon none but thy selfe onely, and then thou shalt besure that they cannot displease thee. But shee, being as empty ofwit as a pith-lesse Cane, and yet thought her judgement to exceedSalomons, could not understand the lest part of hir Unkles meaning,but stood as senselesse as a sheepe. Onely she replyed, that she wouldresort to some other parts of the country, which if shee found asweakly furnished of handsome people, as heere shee did, shee wouldconceive better of her selfe, then ever she had done before.

  • 张弢 08-05

       "What is that?" says Alibech.

  • 胡家庙 08-03

    {  "I know well enough, that you held it as a desired benefit, Gisippusbeing a Native of your Citie, should also be linked to you byalliance: but I know no reason, why I should not be as neere and deereto you at Rome, as if I lived with you heere. Considering, when I amthere, you have a ready and well wishing friend, to stead you in allbeneficiall and serviceable offices, as carefull and provident foryour support, yea, a protectour of you and your affaires, as wellpublique as particular. Who is it then, not transported withpartiall affection, that can (in reason) more approve your act, thenthat which my friend Gisippus hath done? Questionlesse, not any one,as I thinke. Sophronia is married to Titus Quintus Fulvius, a NobleGentleman by antiquitie, a rich Citizen of Rome, and (which is aboveall) the friend of Gisippus: therfore, such a one as thinkes itstrange, is sorrie for it, or would not have it to be; knoweth notwhat he doth.

  • 金敏 08-03

      When first I saw her, that now makes me sigh,

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