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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:温纳泰 大小:yTgEP3fR65675KB 下载:qVlpVMkW73467次
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日期:2020-08-05 11:28:37
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郭军

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Her Chamber being on the streete side, and somewhat juttying overit, she observed the disposition of her Husband, that every night itwas long before he fell asleepe: but beeing once falne into it, nonoyse whatsoever, could easily wake him. This his solemne and soundsleeping, emboldned her so farre, as to meete with Roberto at thestreete doore, which (while her Husband slept) softly she would opento him, and therein private converse with him.
2.  Scarcely were these words concluded, but she felt the custome ofwomen to come upon her, with the paines and throwes incident tochilding: wherefore, with helpe of the aged Lady, Mother to SigniorGentile, it was not long before her deliverance of a goodly Sonne,which greatly augmented the joy of her and Gentile, who tooke order,that all things belonging to a woman in such a case, were not wanting,but she was as carefully respected, even as if she had been his owneWife. Secretly he repaired to Modena, where having given direction forhis place of authority; he returned back againe to Bologna, andthere made preparation for a great and solemne feast, appointing whoshould be his invited guests, the very chiefest persons in Bologna,and (among them) Signior Nicoluccio Caccianimico the especiall man.
3.  Others desires misguide my aim,
4.  Being examined concerning this bloudy fact, he plainly confessed,that hee himselfe had committed the murder, and afterward would notdepart from the Cave, but purposely stayed for apprehension, asbeing truely toucht with compunction for so foule an offence: uponwhich eremptorie confession, Marcus Varro being then Praetor, gavesentence that he should be crucified on a Crosse, as it was the usuallmanner of death in those dayes. Titus chancing to come at the sametime into Praetorium, advisedly beholding the face of the condemnedman (as hee sate upon the bench) knew him to bee Gysippus, not alittle wondring at this strange accident, the povertie of hisestate, and what occasion should bring him thither, especially inthe questioning for his life, and before the Tribunall of justice.
5.  Thy Sacred fires,
6.  When the King had survayed all, and the house likewise, he commendedit beyond all other comparison, and the Tables being placed by thePonds side, he washed his hands therin, and then sat down at the theCount, Sir Guy de Montforte (who was one of them which came in hiscompany) to sitte downe by him, and Signior Neri on his other side. Asfor the other three of the traine, hee commaunded them to attend onhis service, as Signior Neri had given order. There wanted noexquisite Viandes and excellent Wines, all performed in most decentmanner, and without the least noise or disturbance, wherein the Kingtooke no little delight.

计划指导

1.  At one time (above all the rest) among other Potestates andJudges, there came an especiall man, as pickt out of purpose, whowas named Messer Niccolao da San Lepidio, who (at the first beholding)looked rather like a Tinker, then any Officer in authority. Thishansome man (among the rest) was deputed to heare criminall causes.And, as often it happeneth, that Citizens, although no businesseinviteth them to Judiciall Courts, yet they still resort thither,sometimes accidentally: So it fortuned, that Maso times del Saggio,being one morning in search of an especiall friend, went to theCourt-house, and being there, observed in what manner MesserNiccolao was seated; who looking like some strange Fowle, latelycome forth of a farre Countrey; he began to survay him the moreseriously, even from the head to the foot, as we use to say.And albeit he saw his Gowne furred with Miniver, as also the hoodabout his necke, a Penne and Inkehorne hanging at his girdle, andone skirt of his Garment longer then the other, with more misshapensights about him, farre unfitting for a man of so civill profession:yet he spyed one errour extraordinary, the most notable (in hisopinion) that ever he had seene before. Namely, a paultry paire ofBreeches, wickedly made, and worse worne, hanging downe lowe ashalfe his legge, even as he sate upon the Bench, yet cut sosparingly of the Cloath, that they gaped wide open before, as awheele-barrow might have full entrance allowed it. This strangesight was so pleasing to him; as leaving off further search of hisfriend, and scorning to have such a spectacle alone by himselfe: heewent upon another Inquisition; Namely, for two other merry Lads likehirnselfe, the one being called Ribi, and the other Matteuzzo, menof the same mirth-full disposition as he was, and therefore the fitterfor his Company.
2.  All wrapt up in a cloath most fine.
3.  Marcus Varro stood like a man confounded with admiration, being verysorrie, for that which the whole assistants had both seene andheard, yet hee could not (with honour) desist from what must needsbe done, but would performe the Lawes severe injunction. And sendingfor condemned Gisippus backe againe, in the presence of Titus, thus hespake to him. How becamest thou so madly incensed, as (without anytorment inflicted on thee) to confesse an offence by thee nevercommitted? Art thou wearie of thy life? Thou chargest thy selfefalsly, to be the person who this last night murdered the man in theCave, and there is another that voluntarily also doth confesse hisguiltinesse.
4.  Gabriello answered not one word, but being in an exceeding sweate,without any ability of drawing breath, very soon after gave up theghost. How greevous this strange accident was to poore Andreana, wholoved him as deerely as her owne life: you that have felt lovestormenting afflictions, can more easily conceive, then I relate.Wringing her hands, and weeping incessantly, calling him, rubbinghis temples, and using all likely meanes to reduce life: she found allher labour to be spent in vaine, because he was starke dead indeed,and every part of his body as cold as ice: whereupon, she was insuch wofull extremity, that she knew not what to do, or say. All aboutthe Garden she went weeping, in infinite feares and distraction insoule, calling for her Chamber maid, the only secret friend to theirstolne meetings, and told her the occasion of this sodaine sorrow.After they had sighed and mourned awhile, over the dead body ofGabriello, Andreana in this manner spake to her maide.
5.  THE SEVENTH DAY, THE SEVENTH NOVELL
6.  ENEMY TO HIMSELFE. MOREOVER, ADVENTURE OFTENTIMES BRINGETH SUCH

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1.  "But let us come now to our second reason, wherein, with farregreater instance I will shew you, that he hath (in this occasion)shewen himselfe to be much more wise, then you did, or have done:because it plainely appeareth, that you have no feeling of thedivine providence, and much lesse knowledge in the effects offriendship. I say, that your foresight, councell and deliberation,gave Sophronia to Gisippus, a yong Gentleman, and a Philosopher:Gisippus likewise hath given her to a yong Gentleman, and aPhilosopher, as himselfe is. Your discretion gave her to anAthenian; the gift of Gisippus, is to a Romaine. Yours, to a Noble andhonest man; that of Gisippus, to one more Noble by race, and nolesse honest then himselfe. Your judgement hath bestowed her on a richyoung man: Gisippus hath given her to one farre richer. Yourwisedome gave her to one who not onely loved her not, but also onethat had no desire to know her: Gisippus gave her unto him, who, aboveall felicitie else, yea, more than his owne life, both entirelyloved and desired her.
2.  At this instant Theobaldo thought it to be a very apt and convenienttime to disclose himselfe, and to comfort the Lady, with an assuredsignall of hope, for the deliverance of her Father, wherefore he said:Ladie, to the end that I may comfort you infallibly in thisdangerous perill of your fathers life, I am to make knowne anespeciall secret to you, which you are to keepe carefully (as youtender your owne life) from ever being revealed to the world. Theywere then in a place of sufficient privacie, and by themselves,because she reposed great confidence in the Pilgrims sanctity or life,as thinking him none other then he seemed to be. Theobaldo tooke outof his Purse a Ring, which she gave him the last night of theirconversing together, and he had kept with no meane care: and shewingit to her, said; Do you know this Ring Madam? So soone as she sawit, immediatly she knew it, and answered, Yes Sir, I know the Ring,and confesse that heretofore I gave it to Theobaldo.
3.  Saladine, who was a man of accute understanding, did wellperceive, that this Knight Thorello misdoubted his going with him,if (when he met him) hee should have invited him; and therefore,because he would not be denied, of entertaining him into his house; hemade choise of this kinde and honourable course, which caused him toreturne this answer. Gentle Sir, if courtesie in one man to another,do deserve condemning, then may we justly complaine of you, whomeeting us upon the way, which you have shortened by your kindnesse,and which we are no way able to deserve, wee are constrained toaccept, taking you to bee the mirrour of courtesie. Thorello being aKnight of ingenious apprehension, and wel languaged, replyed thus.
4.  After supper, their conference lasted very long, purposely dilatedout in length, that a great part of the night might therein be wasted:when, leaving Andrea to his Chamber, and a Lad to attend, that heshould lacke nothing; she with her women went to their lodgings, andthus our Brother and supposed Sister were parted. The season thenbeing somewhat hot and soultry, Andrea put off his hose and doublet,and being in his shirt alone, layed them underneath the beds boulster,as seeming carefull of his money. But finding a provocation to thehouse of Office, he demanded of the Lad, where hee might find it;who shewed him a little doore in a corner of the Chamber, appointinghim to enter there. Safely enough he went in, but chanced to treadupon a board, which was fastened at neither, ende to the joyntswhereon it lay, being a pit-fall made of purpose, to entrap any suchcoxcombe, as would be trained to so base a place of lodging, so thatboth he and the board fell downe together into the draught; yet suchbeing his good fortune, to receive no harme in the fall (although itwas of extraordinary height) onely the filth of the place, (it beingover full) had fowly myred him.
5.   But why do I trouble you with the repetition of so many countries? Icoasted on still, after I had past Saint Georges Arme, into Truffia,and then into Buffia which are Countries much inhabited, and withgreat people. From thence I went into the Land of Lying, where I foundstore of the Brethren of our Religion, and many other beside, whoshunned all paine and labour, onely for the love of God, and caredas little, for the paines and travailes which others tooke, exceptsome benefit arised thereby to them; nor spend they any money inthis Country, but such as is without stampe. Thence I went into theLand of Abruzzi, where the men and women goe in Galoches over theMountaines, and make them garments of their Swines guts. Not farrefrom thence, I found people, that carried bread in their staves, andwine in Satchels, when parting from them, I arrived among theMountaines of Bacchus, where all the waters run downe with a deepefall, and in short time, I went on so far, that I found my selfe to bein India Pastinaca; where I swear to you by the holy habit which Iweare on my body, that I saw Serpents Bye, things incredible, and suchas were never seene before.But because I would be loth to lye, so soone as I departed thence,I met with Maso de Saggio, who was a great Merchant there, and whomI found cracking Nuts, and selling Cockles by retale. Neverthelesse,al this while I could not finde what I sought for, and therefore I wasto passe from hence by water, if I intended to travaile thither, andso into the Holy Land, where coole fresh bread is sold for fourepence, and the hot is given away for nothing. There I found thevenerable Father (blame me not I beseech you) the most woorthiePatriarch of Jerusalem, who for the reverence due to the habite Iweare, and love to our Lord Baron Saint Anthony, would have me tosee al the holy Reliques, which he had there under his charge:wherof there were so many, as if I should recount them all to you, Inever could come to a conclusion. But yet not to leave youdiscomforted, I will relate some few of them to you. First of all,he shewed me the finger of the holy Ghost, so whole and perfect, asever it was. Next, the nose of the Cherubin, which appeared to SaintFrances; with the payring of the naile of a Seraphin; and one of theribbes of Verbum caro, fastened to one of the Windowes' covered withthe holy garments of the Catholique Faith. Then he tooke me into adarke Chappel, where he shewed me divers beames of the Starre thatappeared to the three Kings in the East. Also a Violl of SaintMichaels sweate, when he combatted with the divell: And the jaw-boneof dead Lazarus, with many other precious things beside. And because Iwas liberall to him, giving him two of the Plaines of Monte Morello,in the Vulgare Edition, and some of the Chapters del Caprezio, whichhe had long laboured in search of; he bestowed on me some of hisReliques. First, he gave me one of the eye-teeth of Santa Crux; anda litle Violl, filled with some part of the sound of those Belles,which hung in the sumptuous Temple of Salomon. Next, he gave mee theFeather of the Phoenix, which was with Noah in the Arke, as before Itold you. And one of the Woodden Pattens, which the good Saint Gerrardde Magnavilla used to weare in his travailes, and which I gave (notlong since) to Gerrardo di Bousy at Florence, where it is respectedwith much devotion. Moreover, he gave me a few of those Coales,wherwith the Phoenix of Noah was roasted; all which things I broughtaway thence with me. Now, most true it is, that my Superiour wouldnever suffer mee to shew them any where, untill he was faithfullycertified, whether they were the same precious Reliques, or no. Butperceyving by sundrie Myracles which they have wrought, and Letters ofsufficient credence receyved from the reverend Patriarch, that allis true, he hath graunted me permission to them, and because I woldnot trust any one with matters of such moment, I my selfe brought themhither with me. Now I must tell you, that the Feather of the samePhoenix, I conveyed into a small Cabinet or Casket, because itshould not be bent or broken. And the Coales wherewith the saidPhoenix was roasted, I put into another Casket, in all respects solike to the former, that many times I have taken one for another. Asnow at this instant it hath bin my fortune: for, imagining that Ibrought the Casket with the feather, I mistooke my self, and broughtthe other with the coales. Wherein doubtles I have not offended,because I am certaine, that we of our Order do not any thing, but itis ordred by divine direction, and our blessed Patron the LordeBaron Saint Anthony. And so much the rather, because about a senighthence, the Feast of Saint Anthony is to bee solemnized, against thepreparation whereof, and to kindle your zeale with the greaterfervencie: he put the Casket with the Coales into my hand, meaning,let you see the Feather, at some more fitting season. And therefore myblessed Sonnes and Daughters, put off your Bonnets, and come hitherwith devotion to looke upon them. But first let me tell you, whosoeveris marked by any of these Coales, with the signe of the Crosse: heor she shal live all this yeare happily, and no fire whatsoevershall come neere to touch or hurt them. So, singing a solemneAntheme in the praise of S. Anthony, he unveyled the Casket, andshewed the Coales openly.The simple multitude, having (with great admiration and reverence)a long while beheld them, they thronged in crouds to Fryar Onyon,giving him farre greater offerings, then before they had, andentreating him to marke them each after other. Whereupon, he takingthe coales in his hand, began to marke their garments of white, andthe veyles on the Womens heads, with Crosses of no meane extendure:affirming to them, that the more the Coales wasted with making thosegreat crosses, the more they still encreased in the Casket, as oftenbefore hee had made triall.
6.  The three Brethren at Florence, bounding within no limites theirdisordered spending; borrowed dayly more and more. And after somefew yeares, the creditors seeing no effect of their hopes to come fromthem, all credit being lost with them, and no repayment of promiseddues, they were imprisoned, their Landes and all they had, notsuffising to pay the moitie of Debts, but their bodies remained inprison for the rest, theyr Wives and young children being sent thence,some to one village, some to another, so that nothing now was to beexpected, but poverty and misery of life for ever. As for honestAlessandro, who had awaited long time for peace in England, perceyvingthere was no likelyhoode of it; and considering also, that (beside histarrying there in vaine to recover his dues) he was in danger of hislife; without any further deferring, he set away for Italy. It came topasse, that as he yssued foorth of Bruges, hee saw a young Abbotalso journeying thence, being cloathed in white, accompanied withdivers Monkes, and a great traine before, conducting the needfullCarriage. Two auncient Knights, kinsmen to the King, followed after;with whom Alessandro acquainted himselfe, as having formerly knownthem, and was kindely accepted into their company. Alessandro ridingalong with them, courteously requested to know, what those Monkswere that rode before, and such a traine attending on them? Wheretoone of the Knights thus answered.

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1.  not able to reveale,
2.  After these, and many more like loving speeches had passed betweenthem; according as Nathan very instantly requested, Mithridanesreturned back with him to the Pallace, where many dayes he highlyhonored and respected him, comforting and counselling him, to perseveralwayes in his honourable determination. But in the end, whenMithridanes could abide there no longer, because necessary occasionscalled him home: he departed thence with his men, having found by goodexperience, that hee could never goe beyond Nathan in liberality.
3.  THAT PROVES TO BE OVERSAWCY WITH HIS MASTER
4、  THE EIGHT DAY, THE SEVENTH NOVELL
5、  The answer of Lisana pleased the Queene exceedingly, in findingher to be so wise and faire, as the King himself had before informedher: who instantly called for her Father and Mother, and knowingthey would be well pleased with whatsoever he did; he called for aproper yong Gentleman, but somewhat poore, being named Perdicano,and putting certaine Rings into his hand, which he refused not toreceive, caused him there to espouse Lisana. To whome the King gaveimmediately (besides Chaines and jewels of inestimable valew,delivered by the Queene to the Bride) Ceffala and Calatabelotta, twogreat territories abounding in divers wealthy possessions, saying toPerdicano. These wee give thee, as a dowry in marriage with thisbeautifull Maid, and greater gifts we will bestow on thee hereafter,as we shal perceive thy love and kindnesse to her.

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  • 李金冯 08-04

      After he had heard and observed all these things, he stoode awhile as confounded with feare and pitty, like a simple silly man,hoodwinkt with his owne passions, not knowing the subtle enemiescunning illusions in offering false suggestions to the sight, to workehis owne ends thereby, and encrease the number of his deceivedservants. Forthwith he perswaded himselfe, that he might make good useof this womans tormenting, so justly imposed on the Knight toprosecute, if thus it should continue still every Friday. Wherefore,setting a good note or marke upon the place, he returned backe tohis owne people, and at such time as he thought convenient, sent fordivers of his kindred and friends from Ravenna, who being present withhim, thus he spake to them.

  • 李光厚 08-04

      All of faire hope, but none of desperate feare;

  • 平亦凡 08-04

       Gulfardo, taking his friend in his company, went to visitMistresse Ambrosia, whom he found in expectation of his arrivall,and the first thing he did, he counted downe the two hundredCrownes; and delivering them to her in the presence of his friend,saide: Mistresse Ambrosia, receive these two hundred Crownes, whichI desire you to pay unto your Husband on my behalfe, when he isreturned from Geneway. Ambrosia, receyved the two hundred Crownes, notregarding wherefore Gulfardo used these words: because shee verilybeleeved, that hee spake in such manner, because his friend shouldtake no notice, of his giving them to her, upon any covenant passedbetweene them; whereuppon, she sayde. Sir, I will pay them to myHusband for you; and cause him to give you a sufficient discharge: butfirst I will count them over my selfe, to see whether the summe bejust, or no. And having drawne them over upon the Table, the summecontaining truly two hundred Crownes (wherewith she was most highlycontented) she lockt them safe uppe in her Cuppeboord, andGulfardoes Friend being gone (as formerly it was compacted betweenethem) shee came to converse more familiarly with him, havingprovided a banquet for him. What passed between them afterward, boththen, and oftentimes beside, before her Husbande returned home, is amatter out of y element, and rather requires my ignoance thenknowledge.

  • 华斌 08-04

      Now was Andrea so confounded this extremity of courtesie, that heknew not what to say, but onely thus replied. I love you as a Sisterought to be loved, and accept of your exceeding kindnesse: but if Ireturne not to my lodging, I shall wrong mine Host and his gueststoo much, because they will not sup untill I come. For that (quothshee) we have a present remedy, one of my servants shall goe andgive warning, whereby they shall not tarry your comming. Albeit, youmight doe me a great kindnesse, to send for your friends to sup withus here, where I assure ye, they shall finde that your Sister (foryour sake) will bid them welcome, and after supper, you may allwalke together to your Inne. Andrea answered, that he had no suchfriends there, as should be so burthenous to her: but seeing she urgedhim so farre, he would stay to sup with her, and referred himselfesolely to her disposition.

  • 张玉党 08-03

    {  BY NO MEANES FULLY CONQUER

  • 张秉龙 08-02

      The Mother laboured by all meanes she could devise, to pacifie herHusbands fury, which proved all in vaine; for being thus impatientlyincensed, he drew foorth his Sword, and stepping with it drawne intothe Chamber (where she had bene delivered of a goodly Sonne) he saidunto her. Either tell me who is the Father of this Bastard, or thouand it shall perish both together. Poore Violenta, lesse respectingher owne life, then she did the childes; forgot her solemne promisemade to Pedro, and discovered all. Which when Amarigo had heard, hegrew so desperately enraged, that hardly he could forbeare fromkilling her. But after hee had spoken what his fury enstructed him,hee mounted on Horsebacke againe, ryding backe to Trapani, where heedisclosed the injury which Pedro had done him, to a noble Gentleman,named Signior Conrado, who was Captaine for the King over the City.}

  • 薛雷周 08-02

      Ambroginolo of Placentia, was likewise come thither, and great storeof Merchandizes hee had brought with him, in a Carracke appertainingto the Venetians, and hee hearing the Captaine of the Guard demaundwhose they were, stepped foorth before him, and smiling, answered:That they were his, but not to be solde; yet if hee liked them, gladlyhe would bestow them on him. Sicurano seeing him smile, suspectedleast himselfe had (by some unfitting behaviour) beene the occasionthereof: and therefore, with a more setled countenance, hee said:Perhaps thou smilest, because I that am a man, professing Armes,should question after such womanish toyes. Ambroginolo replyed, MyLord, pardon mee, I smile not at you, or at your demaund, but at themanner how I came by these things.

  • 张万宏 08-02

      My spirits reassume your former strength,

  • 顾万峰 08-01

       This answere was very welcome to the Marquesse, as apparantlyperceiving hereby, that the dignity whereto hee had exalted her, orany particular favours beside, could not infect her with any pride,coynesse, or disdaine. Not long after, having told her in plaine andopen speeches, that his subjects could not endure her so late bornedaughter: he called a trusty servant of his, and having instructed himwhat he should doe, sent him to Grizelda, and he being alone with her,looking very sadde, and much perplexed in mind, he saide. Madame,except I intend to loose mine owne life, I must accomplish what myLord hath strictly enjoyned me, which is, to take this your yongdaughter, and then I must: So breaking off abruptly, the Ladyhearing his words, and noting his frowning lookes, remembring alsowhat the Marquesse himselfe had formerly said; she presently imagined,that he had commanded his servant to kill the childe. Suddenlytherefore, she tooke it out of the Cradle, and having sweetlykissed, and bestowne her blessing on it (albeit her heart throbbed,with the inward affection of a Mother) without any alteration ofcountenance, she tenderly laid it in the servants armes, and said.Here friend, take it, and doe with it as thy Lord and mine hathcommanded thee: but leave it in no rude place, where birds or savagebeasts may devour it, except it be his will to have it so.

  • 梁晓华 07-30

    {  Being thus conveyed into the Chamber, the night going on apace,and the Gentlewoman fast asleepe in her bed, a lighted Taper stoodburning on the Table by her, as in her Husbands absence shee ever usedto have: Ambroginolo softly opened the Chest, according as cunninglyhee had contrived it, and stepping forth in his sockes made of cloath,observed the scituation of the Chamber, the paintings, pictures, andbeautifull hangings, with all things else that were remarkable,which perfectly he committed to his memory. Going neere to the bed, hesaw her lie there sweetly sleeping, and her young Daughter in likemanner by her, she seeming then as compleate and pleasing acreature, as when shee was attired in her best bravery. No especiallnote or marke could hee descrie, whereof he might make crediblereport, but onely a small wart upon her left pappe, with some fewhaires growing thereon, appearing to be as yellow as gold.

  • 奥帕劳卡 07-30

      Sir, I have heard of a certaine man, named Primasso, one skilfullylearned in the Grammar, and (beyond all other) a very witty andready versifier: in regard whereof, he was so much admired, andfarre renowned, that such as never saw him, but onely heard of him,could easily say, this is Primasso. It came to passe, that beingonce at Paris, in poore estate, as commonly he could light on nobetter fortune (because vertue is slenderly rewarded, by such ashave the greatest possessions) he heard much fame of the Abbot ofClugni, a man reputed (next to the Pope) to be the richest Prelateof the Church. Of him he heard wonderfull and magnificent matters,that he alwayes kept an open and hospitable Court, and never maderefusall of any (from whence soever hee came or went) but they dideate and drinke freely there; provided, that they came when theAbbot was set at the Table. Primasso hearing this, and being anearnest desirer to see magnificent and vertuous men, hee resolved togoe see this rare bounty of the Abbot, demanding how far he dwelt fromParis? Being answered, about some three Leagues thence. Primassomade account, that if he went on betimes in the morning, he shouldeasily reach thither before the houre for dinner.

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