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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:福赛特 大小:93luoMZO55746KB 下载:RB9W9DeR53889次
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日期:2020-08-09 04:58:56
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Being come to Florence, he went to an Inne kept by two brethren,neere neighbours to the dwelling of his Mistresse, and the first thinghe did, was passing by her doore, to get a sight of her if he wereso happie. But he found the windowes, doores, and all parts of thehouse fast shut up, whereby he suspected her to be dead, or else to bechanged from her dwelling: wherefore (much perplexed in minde) he wenton to the two brothers Inne, finding foure persons standing at thegate, attired in mourning, whereat he marvelled not a little;knowing himselfe to be so transfigured, both in body and babite, farrefrom the manner of common use at his parting thence, as it was adifficult matter to know him: he stept boldly to a Shooe-makers shopneere adjoyning, and demanded the reason of their wearing mourning.The Shooe-maker made answer thus; Sir, those men are clad in mourning,because a brother of theirs, being named Theobaldo (who hath beeneabsent hence a long while) about some fifteene dayes since was slaine.And they having heard, by proofe made in the Court of justice, thatone Aldobrandino Palermini (who is kept close prisoner) was themurtherer of him, as he came in a disguised habite to his daughter, ofwhom he was most affectionately enamoured; cannot chuse, but let theWorld know by their outward habits, the inward affliction of theirhearts, for a deede so dishonourably committed. Theobaldo wonderedgreatly hereat, imagining, that some man belike resembling him inshape, might be slaine in this manner, and by Aldobrandino, forwhose misfortune he grieved marvellously. As concerning his Mistresse,he understood that shee was living, and in good health; and nightdrawing on apace, he went to his lodging, with infinite molestationsin his minde, where after supper, he was lodged in a Corne-loft withhis man. Now by reason of many disturbing imaginations, whichincessantly wheeled about his braine, his bed also being none of thebest, and his supper (perhaps) somewhat of the coursest; a greatpart of the night was spent, yet could he not close his eyes together.But lying still broade awake, about the dead time of night, he heardthe treading of divers persons over his head, who discended downe apaire of stayres by his Chamber, into the lower parts of the house,carrying a light with them, which he discerned by the chinkes andcrannies in the wall. Stepping softly out of his bed, to see whatthe meaning hereof might be, he espied a faire young woman, whocarried a light in her hand, and three men in her company,descending downe the stayres together, one of them speaking thus tothe young woman. Now we may boldly warrant our saftey, because we haveheard it assuredly, that the death of Theobaldo Elisei, hath beenesufficiently approved by the Brethren, against Aldobrandino Palermini,and he hath confessed the fact; whereupon the sentence is alreadyset downe in writing. But yet it behooveth us notwithstanding, toconceale it very secretly, because if ever hereafter it should beknowne, that we are they who murthered him, we shall be in the samedanger, as now Aldobrandino is.
2.  The young Maiden, who was still dismayed by her owne Dreame,became much more afflicted in her minde, when shee had heard thisother reported by Gabriello: but yet to give him no occasion ofdistast, she bare it out in the best manner she could devise to doe.And albeit they spent the time in much pleasing discourse,maintained with infinite sweete kisses on either side: yet was shestill suspitious, but knew not whereof; fixing her eyes oftentimesupon his face, and throwing strange lookes to all parts of the Garden,to catch hold on any such blacke ugly sight, whereof he had formerlymade description to her. As thus she continued in these afflictingfeares, it fortuned, that Gabriello sodainly breathing forth a veryvehement sighe, and throwing his armes fast about her, said: O helpeme dear Love, or else I dye; and, in speaking the words, fell downeupon the ground. Which the yong Damosel perceiving, and drawing himinto her lappe, weeping saide: Alas sweete Friend, What paine doestthou feele?
3.  Come lovely Nymphes, lend hands mine eyes to close,
4.  But, as Lovers felicities are sildome permanent, without oneencountring crosse or other: so these stolne pleasures of Pedro andViolenta, met with as sowre a sauce in the farewell. For shee provedto be conceived with childe, then which could befall them no heavieraffliction, and Pedro fearing to loose his life therefore,determined immediate Right, and revealed his purpose to Violenta.Which when she heard, she told him plainly, that if he fled,forth-with she would kill her selfe. Alas deare Love (quoth Pedro)with what reason can you wish my tarrying here? This conception ofyours, doth discover our offence, which a Fathers pity may easilypardon in vou: but I being his servant and vassall, shall bepunished both for your sinne and mine, because he will have no mercyon me. Content thy selfe Pedro, replyed Violenta, I will take suchorder for mine owne offence, by the discreete counsell of my lovingMother, that no blame shall any way be taide on thee, or so much asa surmise, except thou wilt fondly betray thy selfe. If you can do so,answered Pedro, and constantly maintaine your promise; I will notdepart, but see that you prove to bee so good as your word.
5.  Cast an heedfull eye then (good Father) upon all your Gentlemen, andadvisedly examine their vertues, conditions, and manner ofbehaviour. On the other side, observe those parts remaining inGuiscardo: and then if you will Judge truly, and without affection,you will confesse him to be most Noble, and that all your Gentlemen(in respect of him) are but base Groomes and villaines. His vertuesand excelling perfections, I never credited from the report orjudgement of any person; but onely by your speeches, and mine owneeyes as true witnesses. Who did ever more commend Guiscardo, extollingall those singularities in him, most requisite to be in an honestvertuous man; then you your selfe have done? Nor neede you to besorry, or ashamed of your good opinion concerning him: for if mineeyes have not deceived my judgement, you never gave him the least partof praise, but I have knowne much more in him, then ever your wordswere able to expresse: wherefore, if I have beene any way deceived,truly the deceit proceeded onely from you. How wil you then maintaine,that I have throwne my liking on a man of base condition? In troth(Sir) you cannot. Perhaps you will alledge, that he is but meane andpoore; I confesse it, and surely it is to your shame, that you havenot bestowne place of more preferment, on a man so honest and welldeserving, and having bene so long a time your servant.Neverthelesse poverty impayreth not any part of noble Nature, butwealth hurries into horrible confusions. Many Kings and greatPrinces have heeretofore beene poore, when divers of them that havedelved into the earth, and kept Flockes in the field, have beeneadvanced to riches, and exceeded the other in wealth.
6.  HEEREIN IS DECLARED, HOW DANGEROUS THE OCCASION IS, ENSUING BY

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1.  By sight of such as do allure,
2.  DIONEUS: THE DISCOURSES ARE DIRECTED, FOR THE DISCOVERIE OF SUCH
3.  The amorous Duke in his disguise, having long daunced attendanceat Folcoes doore, and no admittance of his entrance; angerlyreturned backe to his Court, protesting severe revenge on Magdalena,if she gave him not the better satisfaction, to cleare her from thusbasely abusing him. On the morrow morning, when Magdalena was foundmurthered in her Chamber, and tidings thereof carried to the Duke;present search was made for the bloody offendor, but Folco beingfled and gone with Ninetta; some there were, who bearing deadly hatredto Hugnetto, incensed the Duke against him and his wife, assupposing them to be guilty of Magdalenaes death. He being theretovery easily perswaded, in regard of his immoderate love to theslaine Gentlewoman; went himselfe in person (attended on by his Guard)to Hugnettoes House, where both he and his wife were seized asprisoners.
4.  In the Town of Pistoia, bordering upon Florence, there lived notlong since, a Knight named Signieur Francesco, descended of the linageor family of the Vergellisi, a man very rich, wise, and in many thingsprovident, but gripple, covetous, and too close handed, withoutrespect to his worth and reputation. He being called to the Officeof Podesta in the City of Millaine, furnished himselfe with all things(in honourable manner) beseeming such a charge; onely, a comelyhorse for his owne saddle excepted, which he knew not by any meaneshow to compasse, so loath hee was lay out money, albeit his creditmuch depended thereon.
5.  Gisippus having heard and seene the manner of this accident, was nota little joyfull, because he had now found a way to death, withoutlaying any violent hand on himselfe; for life being very loathsometo him, it was his only desire to die. Wherfore, he would not budgefrom the place, but taried there so long, till the Sergeants andOfficers of justice (by information of him that did the deede) camethither well attended, and furiously ledde Gisippus thence to prison.
6.  A Florentine knight, named Signior Rogiero de Figiovanni, became aservant to Alphonso, King of Spaine, who (in his owne opinion)seemed but sleightly to respect and reward him. In regard whereof,by a notable experiment, the King gave him a manifest testimony,that it was not through any defect in him, but onely occasioned by theKnights ill fortune; most bountifully recompencing him afterward.

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1.  What Lawes, what threatnings, what feares, could cause the yongarmes of Gisippus to abstaine embraces, betaking himselfe tosolitary walkes, and obscure places, when in his owne bedde, hemight have enjoyed so matchlesse a beauty (who perhaps desired it somuch as himselfe) but onely the gracious title of Amity? Whatgreatnesse, what merits or precedence, could cause Gisippus not tocare, for the losse of his kindred, those of Sophronia, yea, ofSophronia her selfe, not respecting the dishonest murmurings of baseminded people, their vile and contemptible language, scornes andmockeries, and all to content and satisfie a friend, but onelyDivine Amity?
2.  Reniero swelling with discontentment, yet wisely clouding it fromopen apprehension, and knowing well enough, that such goldenspeeches and promises, did alwaies savour of what intemperatespleene would more lavishly have vented foorth, and therefore in amodest dissembling manner; without the least shew of any anger, thushe answered.
3.  Having made their agreement together, and received from Musciattohis expresse procuration, and also the Kings gracious Letters; afterthat Musciatto was gone on his journey, Master Chappelet went toDijon, where he was unknowne (well-neere) of any. And there (quitefrom his naturall disposition) he beganne benignely and graciously, inrecovering the debts due; which course he tooke the rather, becausethey should have a further feeling of him in the end. Being lodgedin the house of two Florentine brethren, that living on their moniesusance; and (for Mounsieur Musciattoes sake) using him with honour andrespect: it fortuned that he fell sicke, and the two brethren sent forPhysitions to attend him, allowing their servants to be diligent abouthim, making no spare of any thing, which gave the best likelyhood ofrestoring his health. But all their paines proved to no purpose,because he (honest man) being now growne aged, and having lived allhis life time very disorderly, fell day by day (according to thePhysicions judgement) from bad to worse, as no other way appearedbut death, whereat the brethren greatly grieved.
4.  In the Spring season,
5.   Leaving off all further talke, because now it was about midnight,they went to the great Church, where finding their enterance to beeasie: they approached neere the Tombe, which was very great, beingtall of Marble, and the cover-stone weighty, yet with crowes of yronand other helps, they raised it so high, that a man might withoutperill passe into it. Now began they to question one another, which ofthe three should enter into the Tombe. Not I, said the first; sosaid the second: No nor I, answered Andrea. Which when the other twoheard, they caught fast hold of him, saying. Wilt not thou goe intothe Tombe? Be advised what thou sayest, for, if thou wilt not goein: we will so beat thee with one of these yron crowes, that thoushalt never goe out of this Church alive.
6.  Bernardo saide, Be it a bargaine, am the man that will make goodmy five thousand Duckets; and albeit the other Merchants then present,earnestly laboured to breake the wager, knowing great harme must needsensue thereon: yet both the parties were so hot and fiery, as allthe other men spake to no effect, but writings was made, sealed, anddelivered under either of their hands, Bernardo remaining at Paris,and Ambroginolo departing for Geneway. There he remained some fewdayes, to learne the streetes name where Bernardo dwelt, as also theconditions and qualities of his Wife, which scarcely pleased himwhen he heard them; because they were farre beyond her Husbandsrelation, and shee reputed to be the onely wonder of women; whereby heplainely perceived, that he had undertaken a very idle enterprise, yetwould he not give it over so, but proceeded therein a little further.

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1.  Having thus spoken, he arose againe; granting leave to the rest,to recreate themselves till supper time. The Garden was very faire andspacious, affoording, large limits for their severall walkes; theSun being already so low descended, that it could not be offensiveto any one, the Connies, Kids, and young Hindes skipping every whereabout them, to their no meane, pleasure and contentment, Dioneus andFiammetta, sate singing together, of Messire Guiglielmo, and theLady of Vertur. Philomena and Pamphilus playing at the Chesse, allsporting themselves as best they pleased. But the houre of Supperbeing come, and the Tables covered about the faire fountaine, theysate downe and supt in most loving manner. Then Philostratus, not toswerve from the course which had beene observed by the Queenesbefore him, so soone as the Tables were taken away, gave commaund thatMadam Lauretta should beginne the dance, and likewise to sing aSong. My gracious Lord (quoth she) I can skill of no other Songs,but onely a peece of mine owne, which I have already learned by heart,and may well beseeme this assembly: if you please to allow of that,I am ready to performe it with all obedience. Lady, replyed theKing, you your selfe being so faire and lovely, so needs must bewhatsoever commeth from you, therefore let us heare such as youhave. Madam Lauretta, giving enstruction to the Chorus prepared, andbegan in this manner.
2.  She saw beside in many places about her, goodly Woods, fayre cooleshades, and Country houses here and there dispersed; which added thegreater violence to hir affliction, that her desires (in all these)could no way be accomplished. What shall I say more concerning thisdisastrous Lady? The parching beames of the Sunne above her, thescalding heat of the Lead beneath her, the Hornets and Flyes everieway stinging her, had made such an alteration of her beautifull bodie:that, as it checkt and controlled the precedent nights darkenesse,it was now so metamorphosed with rednesse, yea, and blood issuingforth in infinite places, as she seemed (almost) loathsome to lookeon, continuing still in this agonie of torment, quite voyde of allhope, and rather expecting death, then any other comfort.
3.  The men of Rhodes, being rather constrained thereto, then of anyfree disposition in themselves, with teares in their eyes, deliveredIphigenia to Chynon; who beholding her in like manner to weepe, thusspake unto her. Noble Lady, do not any way discomfort your selfe,for I am your Chynon, who have more right and true title to you, andmuch better doe deserve to enjoy you, by my long continued affectionto you, then Pasimondo can any way plead; because you belong to himbut onely by promise. So, bringing her aboord his owne ship, where theGentlemen his companions gave her kinde welcome, without touchingany thing else belonging to the Rhodians, he gave them free liberty todepart.
4、  My worthy friend Jehannot, thou art extremely desirous, that Ishould convert to Christianitie, and I am well contented to doe it;onely upon this condition: That first I wil journey to Rome, to seehim whom thou sayest, is Gods general Vicar here on earth, and toconsider on the course of his life and manners, and likewise of hisColledge of Cardinals. If he and they doe appeare such men to mee,as thy speeches affirme them to be, and thereby I may comprehendthat thy Faith and Religion is better then mine, as with no meanepaines thou endevourest to perswade mee, I will become a Christianas thou art: but if I finde it otherwise, I will continue as I am, aJew.
5、  But Grinello remembring himselfe, that the houre of hisappointment with Giovanni was come, he saide to himselfe. What careI whether our olde Maide be present, or no? If she disclose anything that I doe, I can be revenged on her when I list. So, havingmade the signall, he went to open the doore, even when Giovanni (andtwo of his confederates) rushed into the House, and finding thefaire young Maiden sitting in the Hall, laide hands on her, to beareher away. The Damosell began to resist them, crying out for helpe soloude as she could, as the olde Chamber-maide did the like: whichMenghino hearing, he ranne thither presently with his friends, andseeing the young Damosell brought well-neere out of the House; theydrew their Swords, crying out: Traytors, you are but dead men, here isno violence to be offered, neither is this a booty for such basegroomes. So they layed about them lustily, and would not permit themto passe any further. On the other side, upon this mutinous noyseand outcry, the Neighbours came foorth of their houses, with lights,staves, and clubbes, greatly reproving them for this out-rage, yetassisting Menghino: by meanes whereof, after a long time ofcontention, Menghino recovered the Mayden from Giovanni, and placedher peaceably in Jacominoes House.

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  • 冯英 08-08

      In the City of Pistoya, there dwelt sometime a beautifullGentlewoman, being a Widdow, whom two of our Florentines (the onenamed Rinuccio Palermini, and the other Alessandro Chiarmontesi,having withdrawne themselves to Pistoya) desperately affected, the oneignorant of the others intention, but each carrying his caseclosely, as hoping to be possessed of her. This Gentlewoman, namedMadame Francesca de Lazzari, being often solicited by theirmessages, and troublesomely pestered with their importunities: at last(lesse advisedly then she intended) shee granted admittance to heareeither of them speake. Which she repenting, and coveting to be ridof them both, a matter not easie to be done: she wittily devised theonely meanes, namely, to move such a motion to them, as neitherwould willingly undertake, yet within the compasse of possibility; butthey failing in the performance, shee might have the more honestoccasion, to bee free from all further mollestation by them, and herpolitike intention was thus projected.

  • 王宇佳 08-08

      When the Gentlemen understood, that the Mayden was borne inFaenza, they marvelled thereat, and after they had thanked Jacominofor his curteous answer; they desired him to let them know, by whatmeanes the Damosell came into his custody, and how he knew her to beborne in Faenza: when hee, perceiving them attentive to heare him,began in this manner.

  • 翟卫平 08-08

       Many notable courses whee.ed about his conceit, every onepromising fairely, and ministring meanes of formall apparance, yet one(above the rest) wonne his absolute allowance, which he intended toprosecute as best he might. In which resolution, he kept still veryclose, so long as Spinelloccio was with his Wife; but hee beinggone, he went into the Chamber, where he found his wife, amendingthe forme of her head attyre, which Spinelloccio had put into adisordred fashion. Wife (quoth be) what art thou doing? Why? Do younot see Husband? answered she. Yes that I do wife, replied Zeppa,and something else happened to my sight, which I could wish that I hadnot seene. Rougher Language growing betweene them, of his avouching,and her as stout denying, with defending her cause over-weakely,against the manifest proofes both of eye and eare: at last she fell onher knees before him, weeping incessantly, and no excuses nowavailing, she confest her long acquaintance with Spinelloccio, andmost humbly entreated him to forgive her. Uppon the which penitentconfession and submission, Zeppa thus answered.

  • 王妍 08-08

      If Love were free from jealousie,

  • 余豆豆 08-07

    {  Cousine, thine unkinde usage by thine husband, is not unknown to me,how he did beate thee (beyond the compasse of all reason) when hebrought home stones from the plain of Mugnone; in which regard, I amvery desirous to have thee revenged on him: which if thou wilt not do,never repute me heereafter for thy Kinsman and Friend. He is falnein love with a Woman of the common gender, one that is to be hired formoney: he hath his private meetings with her, and the place ispartly knowne to me, as by a secret appointment (made very lately) Iam credibly given to understand; wherefore walke presently alongwith me, and thou shalt take him in the heat of his knavery.

  • 格莱美 08-06

      Our King (most Noble and vertuous Ladies) hath this day given us asubject, very rough and stearne to discourse on, and so much therather, if we consider, that we are come hither to be merry andpleasant, where sad Tragicall reports are no way suteable, especially,by reviving the teares of others, to bedew our owne cheekes withall.Nor can any such argument be spoken of, without moving compassion bothin the reporters, and hearers. But (perhaps) it was his Highnessepleasure, to moderate the delights which we have already had. Orwhatsoever else hath provoked him thereto, seeing it is not lawfullfor me, to alter or contradict his appointment; I will recount anaccident very pittifull, or rather most unfortinate, and well worthyto be graced with bur teares.}

  • 周纯慧 08-06

      Master Chappelet still wept and sighed, and continued silent,notwithstanding all the Confessors comfortable perswasions; butafter hee had helde him a long while in suspence, breathing forth asighe, even as if his very heart would have broken, he saide; HolyFather, seeing you promise to pray to God for me, I will reveale it toyou: Know then, that when I was a little boy, I did once curse myMother; which he had no sooner spoken, but he wrung his hands, andgreeved extraordinarily. Oh good Son, saide the Friar: doth that seemeso great a sinne to thee? Why, men doe daily blaspheme our Lord God,and yet neverthelesse, upon their hearty repentance, he is alwayesready to forgive them; and wilt not thou beleeve to obtaine remission,for a sinne so ignorantly committed? Weepe no more deare Sonne, butcomfort thy selfe and rest resolved, that if thou wert one of them,who nayled our blessed Saviour to his Crosse; yet being so trulyrepentant, as I see thou art, he would freely forgive thee. Say you soFather? quoth Chappelet. What mine owne deare Mother? that bare mein her wombe nine moneths, day and night, and afterwards fed me withher breasts a thousand times, can I be pardoned for cursing her? Ohno, it is too haynous a sinne, and except you pray to God veryinstantly for me, he will not forgive me.

  • 孙建军 08-06

      In the Spring season, etc.

  • 张友国 08-05

       In regard of which deniall, Messer Geri commaunded one of hisservants, to take a small Bottle, and request Cistio to fill it withhis good Wine; then afterward, to serve it in such sparing manner tothe Table, that each Gentleman might be allowed halfe a glasse-full attheir down-sitting. The Serving-man, who had heard great report of theWine, and was halfe offended because he could never taste thereof:tooke a great Flaggon Bottle, containing foure or five Gallons atthe least, and comming there-with unto Cistio, saide unto him. Cistio,because my Master cannot have your companie among his friends, heprayes you to fill this Bottle with your best Wine. Cistio lookinguppon the huge Flaggon, replyed thus. Honest Fellow, Messer Geri neversent thee with such a Message to me: which although the Serving-manvery stoutly maintained, yet getting no other answer, he returnedbacke therwith to his Master.

  • 林浩坤 08-03

    {  PERSONS, WHOSE LOVES HAVE HAD SUCCESSELESSE ENDING

  • 阎肃 08-03

      When Signior Ansaldo heard her demand, and the offer besidethereuppon made him (although it seemed no easie matter, but a thingmeerly impossible to be done) he considered advisedly, that she madethis motion to no other end, but onely to bereave him of all his hope,ever to enjoy what so earnestly hee desired: neverthelesse, he wouldnot so give it utterly over, but would needs approve what could bedone. Heereupon, hee sent into divers partes of the world, to find outany one that was able to advise him in this doubtfull case. In theend, one was brought to him, who beeing well recompenced for hispaines, by the Art of Nigromancie would under take to do it. Withhim Signior Ansaldo covenanted, binding himselfe to pay a greatsumme of mony, upon performance of so rare a deed, awaiting (inhopefull expectation) for the month of januaries comming. It beingcome, and the weather then in extreamity of cold, every beingcovered with ice and snow, the Magitian prevailed so by his Art,that after the Christmas Holy dayes were past, and the Calends ofjanuary entred: in one night, and without the Cittie Wals, thegoodliest Garden of flowers and fruites, was sodainely sprung up, as(in opinion of such as beheld it) never was the like seen before.Now Ladies, I think I need not demand the question, whether SigniorAnsaldo were wel pleased, or no, who going to beholde t, saw it mostplenteously stored, with al kind of fruit trees, flowers, herbes andplants, as no one could be named, that was wanting in this artificiallgarden. And having gathered some pretty store of them, secretly hesent them to Madam Dianora, inviting hir to come see her Garden,perfected according to her owne desire, and uppon view thereof, toconfesse the integrity of his love to her; considering andremembring withall, the promise shee had made him under solemneoath, that she might be reputed for a woman of her word.

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