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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:李可 大小:b9pL5uBz83457KB 下载:MHRRzj0J83216次
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日期:2020-08-04 20:35:36
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  As he said this Euryclea left the cloister to fetch some more water,for the first had been all spilt; and when she had washed him andanointed him with oil, Ulysses drew his seat nearer to the fire towarm himself, and hid the scar under his rags. Then Penelope begantalking to him and said:
2.  "I will tell you all about them," replied Eumaeus, "Laertes is stillliving and prays heaven to let him depart peacefully his own house,for he is terribly distressed about the absence of his son, and alsoabout the death of his wife, which grieved him greatly and aged himmore than anything else did. She came to an unhappy end through sorrowfor her son: may no friend or neighbour who has dealt kindly by mecome to such an end as she did. As long as she was still living,though she was always grieving, I used to like seeing her and askingher how she did, for she brought me up along with her daughterCtimene, the youngest of her children; we were boy and girltogether, and she made little difference between us. When, however, weboth grew up, they sent Ctimene to Same and received a splendiddowry for her. As for me, my mistress gave me a good shirt and cloakwith a pair of sandals for my feet, and sent me off into thecountry, but she was just as fond of me as ever. This is all over now.Still it has pleased heaven to prosper my work in the situationwhich I now hold. I have enough to eat and drink, and can findsomething for any respectable stranger who comes here; but there is nogetting a kind word or deed out of my mistress, for the house hasfallen into the hands of wicked people. Servants want sometimes to seetheir mistress and have a talk with her; they like to have somethingto eat and drink at the house, and something too to take back withthem into the country. This is what will keep servants in a goodhumour."
3.  He had hardly done speaking when Amphinomus turned in his placeand saw the ship inside the harbour, with the crew lowering her sails,and putting by their oars; so he laughed, and said to the others,"We need not send them any message, for they are here. Some god musthave told them, or else they saw the ship go by, and could notovertake her.
4.  To this Telemachus answered, "Father, I have always heard of yourrenown both in the field and in council, but the task you talk of is avery great one: I am awed at the mere thought of it; two men cannotstand against many and brave ones. There are not ten suitors only, nortwice ten, but ten many times over; you shall learn their number atonce. There are fifty-two chosen youths from Dulichium, and theyhave six servants; from Same there are twenty-four; twenty youngAchaeans from Zacynthus, and twelve from Ithaca itself, all of themwell born. They have with them a servant Medon, a bard, and two menwho can carve at table. If we face such numbers as this, you mayhave bitter cause to rue your coming, and your revenge. See whetheryou cannot think of some one who would be willing to come and helpus."
5.  Then Penelope sprang up from her couch, threw her arms roundEuryclea, and wept for joy. "But my dear nurse," said she, "explainthis to me; if he has really come home as you say, how did he manageto overcome the wicked suitors single handed, seeing what a numberof them there always were?"
6.  "My dear child," answered Eurynome, "all that you have said is true,go and tell your son about it, but first wash yourself and anoint yourface. Do not go about with your cheeks all covered with tears; it isnot right that you should grieve so incessantly; for Telemachus,whom you always prayed that you might live to see with a beard, isalready grown up."

计划指导

1.  With these words she made her mistress leave off crying, and driedthe tears from her eyes. Penelope washed her face, changed herdress, and went upstairs with her maids. She then put some bruisedbarley into a basket and began praying to Minerva.
2.  Then Minerva bethought her of another matter. When she deemed thatUlysses had had both of his wife and of repose, she badegold-enthroned Dawn rise out of Oceanus that she might shed light uponmankind. On this, Ulysses rose from his comfortable bed and said toPenelope, "Wife, we have both of us had our full share of troubles,you, here, in lamenting my absence, and I in being prevented fromgetting home though I was longing all the time to do so. Now, however,that we have at last come together, take care of the property thatis in the house. As for the sheep and goats which the wicked suitorshave eaten, I will take many myself by force from other people, andwill compel the Achaeans to make good the rest till they shall havefilled all my yards. I am now going to the wooded lands out in thecountry to see my father who has so long been grieved on my account,and to yourself I will give these instructions, though you have littleneed of them. At sunrise it will at once get abroad that I have beenkilling the suitors; go upstairs, therefore, and stay there withyour women. See nobody and ask no questions."
3.  ULYSSES was left in the cloister, pondering on the means wherebywith Minerva's help he might be able to kill the suitors. Presently hesaid to Telemachus, "Telemachus, we must get the armour together andtake it down inside. Make some excuse when the suitors ask you why youhave removed it. Say that you have taken it to be out of the way ofthe smoke, inasmuch as it is no longer what it was when Ulysses wentaway, but has become soiled and begrimed with soot. Add to this moreparticularly that you are afraid Jove may set them on to quarrelover their wine, and that they may do each other some harm which maydisgrace both banquet and wooing, for the sight of arms sometimestempts people to use them."
4.  Then, when they had finished their work and the meal was ready, theyate it, and every man had his full share so that all were satisfied.As soon as they had had enough to eat and drink, they laid down torest and enjoyed the boon of sleep.
5.  "We sailed hence, always in much distress, till we came to theland of the lawless and inhuman Cyclopes. Now the Cyclopes neitherplant nor plough, but trust in providence, and live on such wheat,barley, and grapes as grow wild without any kind of tillage, and theirwild grapes yield them wine as the sun and the rain may grow them.They have no laws nor assemblies of the people, but live in caves onthe tops of high mountains; each is lord and master in his family, andthey take no account of their neighbours.
6.  "I stayed there for seven years and got together much money amongthe Egyptians, for they all gave me something; but when it was nowgoing on for eight years there came a certain Phoenician, a cunningrascal, who had already committed all sorts of villainy, and thisman talked me over into going with him to Phoenicia, where his houseand his possessions lay. I stayed there for a whole twelve months, butat the end of that time when months and days had gone by till the sameseason had come round again, he set me on board a ship bound forLibya, on a pretence that I was to take a cargo along with him to thatplace, but really that he might sell me as a slave and take themoney I fetched. I suspected his intention, but went on board withhim, for I could not help it.

推荐功能

1.  But Ulysses, when he had taken it up and examined it all over,strung it as easily as a skilled bard strings a new peg of his lyreand makes the twisted gut fast at both ends. Then he took it in hisright hand to prove the string, and it sang sweetly under his touchlike the twittering of a swallow. The suitors were dismayed, andturned colour as they heard it; at that moment, moreover, Jovethundered loudly as a sign, and the heart of Ulysses rejoiced as heheard the omen that the son of scheming Saturn had sent him.
2.  "The ghosts of other dead men stood near me and told me each his ownmelancholy tale; but that of Ajax son of Telamon alone held aloof-still angry with me for having won the cause in our dispute aboutthe armour of Achilles. Thetis had offered it as a prize, but theTrojan prisoners and Minerva were the judges. Would that I had nevergained the day in such a contest, for it cost the life of Ajax, whowas foremost of all the Danaans after the son of Peleus, alike instature and prowess.
3.  When earth-encircling Neptune heard this he went to Scheria wherethe Phaecians live, and stayed there till the ship, which was makingrapid way, had got close-in. Then he went up to it, turned it intostone, and drove it down with the flat of his hand so as to root it inthe ground. After this he went away.
4.  Thus did he speak, and his words set them all a weeping. Helen wept,Telemachus wept, and so did Menelaus, nor could Pisistratus keep hiseyes from filling, when he remembered his dear brother Antilochus whomthe son of bright Dawn had killed. Thereon he said to Menelaus,
5.   Ulysses, therefore, went to Parnassus to get the presents fromAutolycus, who with his sons shook hands with him and gave himwelcome. His grandmother Amphithea threw her arms about him, andkissed his head, and both his beautiful eyes, while Autolycusdesired his sons to get dinner ready, and they did as he told them.They brought in a five year old bull, flayed it, made it ready anddivided it into joints; these they then cut carefully up intosmaller pieces and spitted them; they roasted them sufficiently andserved the portions round. Thus through the livelong day to thegoing down of the sun they feasted, and every man had his full shareso that all were satisfied; but when the sun set and it came ondark, they went to bed and enjoyed the boon of sleep.
6.  And Minerva answered, "I will tell you truly and particularly allabout it. I am Mentes, son of Anchialus, and I am King of theTaphians. I have come here with my ship and crew, on a voyage to menof a foreign tongue being bound for Temesa with a cargo of iron, and Ishall bring back copper. As for my ship, it lies over yonder off theopen country away from the town, in the harbour Rheithron under thewooded mountain Neritum. Our fathers were friends before us, as oldLaertes will tell you, if you will go and ask him. They say,however, that he never comes to town now, and lives by himself inthe country, faring hardly, with an old woman to look after him andget his dinner for him, when he comes in tired from pottering abouthis vineyard. They told me your father was at home again, and that waswhy I came, but it seems the gods are still keeping him back, for heis not dead yet not on the mainland. It is more likely he is on somesea-girt island in mid ocean, or a prisoner among savages who aredetaining him against his will I am no prophet, and know very littleabout omens, but I speak as it is borne in upon me from heaven, andassure you that he will not be away much longer; for he is a man ofsuch resource that even though he were in chains of iron he would findsome means of getting home again. But tell me, and tell me true, canUlysses really have such a fine looking fellow for a son? You areindeed wonderfully like him about the head and eyes, for we were closefriends before he set sail for Troy where the flower of all theArgives went also. Since that time we have never either of us seen theother."

应用

1.  "I know, Eurynome," replied Penelope, "that you mean well, but donot try and persuade me to wash and to anoint myself, for heavenrobbed me of all my beauty on the day my husband sailed; nevertheless,tell Autonoe and Hippodamia that I want them. They must be with mewhen I am in the cloister; I am not going among the men alone; itwould not be proper for me to do so."
2.  "I lent it him," answered Noemon, "what else could I do when a manof his position said he was in a difficulty, and asked me to obligehim? I could not possibly refuse. As for those who went with himthey were the best young men we have, and I saw Mentor go on boardas captain- or some god who was exactly like him. I cannotunderstand it, for I saw Mentor here myself yesterday morning, and yethe was then setting out for Pylos."
3.  Thus sang the bard, but Ulysses drew his purple mantle over his headand covered his face, for he was ashamed to let the Phaeacians seethat he was weeping. When the bard left off singing he wiped the tearsfrom his eyes, uncovered his face, and, taking his cup, made adrink-offering to the gods; but when the Phaeacians pressedDemodocus to sing further, for they delighted in his lays, thenUlysses again drew his mantle over his head and wept bitterly. Noone noticed his distress except Alcinous, who was sitting near him,and heard the heavy sighs that he was heaving. So he at once said,"Aldermen and town councillors of the Phaeacians, we have had enoughnow, both of the feast, and of the minstrelsy that is its dueaccompaniment; let us proceed therefore to the athletic sports, sothat our guest on his return home may be able to tell his friendshow much we surpass all other nations as boxers, wrestlers, jumpers,and runners."
4、  Then Ulysses in his turn melted, and wept as he clasped his dear andfaithful wife to his bosom. As the sight of land is welcome to men whoare swimming towards the shore, when Neptune has wrecked their shipwith the fury of his winds and waves- a few alone reach the land,and these, covered with brine, are thankful when they findthemselves on firm ground and out of danger- even so was her husbandwelcome to her as she looked upon him, and she could not tear hertwo fair arms from about his neck. Indeed they would have gone onindulging their sorrow till rosy-fingered morn appeared, had notMinerva determined otherwise, and held night back in the far west,while she would not suffer Dawn to leave Oceanus, nor to yoke thetwo steeds Lampus and Phaethon that bear her onward to break the dayupon mankind.
5、  And Ulysses answered, "In good truth, goddess, it seems I shouldhave come to much the same bad end in my own house as Agamemnon did,if you had not given me such timely information. Advise me how I shallbest avenge myself. Stand by my side and put your courage into myheart as on the day when we loosed Troy's fair diadem from her brow.Help me now as you did then, and I will fight three hundred men, ifyou, goddess, will be with me."

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  • 雅克夫·克里恩 08-03

      "Then we entered the Straits in great fear of mind, for on the onehand was Scylla, and on the other dread Charybdis kept sucking upthe salt water. As she vomited it up, it was like the water in acauldron when it is boiling over upon a great fire, and the sprayreached the top of the rocks on either side. When she began to suckagain, we could see the water all inside whirling round and round, andit made a deafening sound as it broke against the rocks. We couldsee the bottom of the whirlpool all black with sand and mud, and themen were at their wit's ends for fear. While we were taken up withthis, and were expecting each moment to be our last, Scylla pounceddown suddenly upon us and snatched up my six best men. I was lookingat once after both ship and men, and in a moment I saw their hands andfeet ever so high above me, struggling in the air as Scylla wascarrying them off, and I heard them call out my name in one lastdespairing cry. As a fisherman, seated, spear in hand, upon somejutting rock throws bait into the water to deceive the poor littlefishes, and spears them with the ox's horn with which his spear isshod, throwing them gasping on to the land as he catches them one byone- even so did Scylla land these panting creatures on her rock andmunch them up at the mouth of her den, while they screamed andstretched out their hands to me in their mortal agony. This was themost sickening sight that I saw throughout all my voyages.

  • 张岂凡 08-03

      "So you are come, Telemachus, light of my eyes that you are. WhenI heard you had gone to Pylos I made sure I was never going to see youany more. Come in, my dear child, and sit down, that I may have a goodlook at you now you are home again; it is not very often you come intothe country to see us herdsmen; you stick pretty close to the towngenerally. I suppose you think it better to keep an eye on what thesuitors are doing."

  • 郁骁 08-03

       "Eumaeus, what a noble hound that is over yonder on the manure heap:his build is splendid; is he as fine a fellow as he looks, or is heonly one of those dogs that come begging about a table, and are keptmerely for show?"

  • 津浦 08-03

      Laertes was delighted when he heard this. "Good heavens, heexclaimed, "what a day I am enjoying: I do indeed rejoice at it. Myson and grandson are vying with one another in the matter of valour."

  • 克·马 08-02

    {  As he thus prayed, Minerva came close up to him in the likenessand with the voice of Mentor. "Telemachus," said she, "if you are madeof the same stuff as your father you will be neither fool nor cowardhenceforward, for Ulysses never broke his word nor left his workhalf done. If, then, you take after him, your voyage will not befruitless, but unless you have the blood of Ulysses and of Penelope inyour veins I see no likelihood of your succeeding. Sons are seldomas good men as their fathers; they are generally worse, not better;still, as you are not going to be either fool or cowardhenceforward, and are not entirely without some share of your father'swise discernment, I look with hope upon your undertaking. But mind younever make common cause with any of those foolish suitors, for theyhave neither sense nor virtue, and give no thought to death and to thedoom that will shortly fall on one and all of them, so that they shallperish on the same day. As for your voyage, it shall not be longdelayed; your father was such an old friend of mine that I will findyou a ship, and will come with you myself. Now, however, returnhome, and go about among the suitors; begin getting provisions readyfor your voyage; see everything well stowed, the wine in jars, and thebarley meal, which is the staff of life, in leathern bags, while Igo round the town and beat up volunteers at once. There are many shipsin Ithaca both old and new; I will run my eye over them for you andwill choose the best; we will get her ready and will put out to seawithout delay."

  • 杨林 08-01

      BOOK VII.}

  • 费列罗 08-01

      "Sir, and all of you, farewell. Make your drink-offerings and sendme on my way rejoicing, for you have fulfilled my heart's desire bygiving me an escort, and making me presents, which heaven grant that Imay turn to good account; may I find my admirable wife living in peaceamong friends, and may you whom I leave behind me give satisfaction toyour wives and children; may heaven vouchsafe you every good grace,and may no evil thing come among your people."

  • 张乔 08-01

      "I know, Eurynome," replied Penelope, "that you mean well, but donot try and persuade me to wash and to anoint myself, for heavenrobbed me of all my beauty on the day my husband sailed; nevertheless,tell Autonoe and Hippodamia that I want them. They must be with mewhen I am in the cloister; I am not going among the men alone; itwould not be proper for me to do so."

  • 张松 07-31

       "But the cruel wretch said, 'Then I will eat all Noman's comradesbefore Noman himself, and will keep Noman for the last. This is thepresent that I will make him.'

  • 张周来 07-29

    {  "As he spoke he dived under the waves, whereon I turned back tothe ships with my companions, and my heart was clouded with care asI went along. When we reached the ships we got supper ready, for nightwas falling, and camped down upon the beach. When the child ofmorning, rosy-fingered Dawn appeared, we drew our ships into thewater, and put our masts and sails within them; then we went onboard ourselves, took our seats on the benches, and smote the grey seawith our oars. I again stationed my ships in the heaven-fed streamof Egypt, and offered hecatombs that were full and sufficient. WhenI had thus appeased heaven's anger, I raised a barrow to the memory ofAgamemnon that his name might live for ever, after which I had a quickpassage home, for the gods sent me a fair wind.

  • 蒋卓庆 07-29

      SO HERE Ulysses slept, overcome by sleep and toil; but Minervawent off to the country and city of the Phaecians- a people who usedto live in the fair town of Hypereia, near the lawless Cyclopes. Nowthe Cyclopes were stronger than they and plundered them, so their kingNausithous moved them thence and settled them in Scheria, far from allother people. He surrounded the city with a wall, built houses andtemples, and divided the lands among his people; but he was dead andgone to the house of Hades, and King Alcinous, whose counsels wereinspired of heaven, was now reigning. To his house, then, didMinerva hie in furtherance of the return of Ulysses.

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