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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:魏继 大小:oXW7atrO69317KB 下载:U47ElC5G82892次
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日期:2020-08-06 08:01:30
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "If you really are my son Ulysses," replied Laertes, "and havecome back again, you must give me such manifest proof of your identityas shall convince me."
2.  But Neptune did not forget the threats with which he had alreadythreatened Ulysses, so he took counsel with Jove. "Father Jove,"said he, "I shall no longer be held in any sort of respect among yougods, if mortals like the Phaeacians, who are my own flesh andblood, show such small regard for me. I said I would Ulysses gethome when he had suffered sufficiently. I did not say that he shouldnever get home at all, for I knew you had already nodded your headabout it, and promised that he should do so; but now they have broughthim in a ship fast asleep and have landed him in Ithaca afterloading him with more magnificent presents of bronze, gold, andraiment than he would ever have brought back from Troy, if he hadhad his share of the spoil and got home without misadventure."
3.  "To this he gave me but a pitiless answer, 'Stranger,' said he, 'youare a fool, or else you know nothing of this country. Talk to me,indeed, about fearing the gods or shunning their anger? We Cyclopes donot care about Jove or any of your blessed gods, for we are ever somuch stronger than they. I shall not spare either yourself or yourcompanions out of any regard for Jove, unless I am in the humour fordoing so. And now tell me where you made your ship fast when youcame on shore. Was it round the point, or is she lying straight offthe land?'
4.  "When I had said this she went straight through the court with herwand in her hand and opened the pigsty doors. My men came out likeso many prime hogs and stood looking at her, but she went aboutamong them and anointed each with a second drug, whereon thebristles that the bad drug had given them fell off, and they becamemen again, younger than they were before, and much taller and betterlooking. They knew me at once, seized me each of them by the hand, andwept for joy till the whole house was filled with the sound of theirhullabalooing, and Circe herself was so sorry for them that she cameup to me and said, 'Ulysses, noble son of Laertes, go back at onceto the sea where you have left your ship, and first draw it on tothe land. Then, hide all your ship's gear and property in some cave,and come back here with your men.'
5.  Ulysses hailed this as of good omen, and Antinous set a great goat'spaunch before him filled with blood and fat. Amphinomus took twoloaves out of the bread-basket and brought them to him, pledging himas he did so in a golden goblet of wine. "Good luck to you," hesaid, "father stranger, you are very badly off at present, but Ihope you will have better times by and by."
6.  As for Melanthius, they took him through the cloister into the innercourt. There they cut off his nose and his ears; they drew out hisvitals and gave them to the dogs raw, and then in their fury theycut off his hands and his feet.

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1.  Thereon he floated about for two nights and two days in the water,with a heavy swell on the sea and death staring him in the face; butwhen the third day broke, the wind fell and there was a dead calmwithout so much as a breath of air stirring. As he rose on the swellhe looked eagerly ahead, and could see land quite near. Then, aschildren rejoice when their dear father begins to get better afterhaving for a long time borne sore affliction sent him by some angryspirit, but the gods deliver him from evil, so was Ulysses thankfulwhen he again saw land and trees, and swam on with all his strengththat he might once more set foot upon dry ground. When, however, hegot within earshot, he began to hear the surf thundering up againstthe rocks, for the swell still broke against them with a terrificroar. Everything was enveloped in spray; there were no harbourswhere a ship might ride, nor shelter of any kind, but onlyheadlands, low-lying rocks, and mountain tops.
2.  Pontonous mixed the wine and handed it to every one in turn; theothers each from his own seat made a drink-offering to the blessedgods that live in heaven, but Ulysses rose and placed the double cupin the hands of queen Arete.
3.  And Telemachus answered, "I will tell you truly everything. There isno emnity between me and my people, nor can I complain of brothers, towhom a man may look for support however great his quarrel may be. Jovehas made us a race of only sons. Laertes was the only son ofArceisius, and Ulysses only son of Laertes. I am myself the only sonof Ulysses who left me behind him when he went away, so that I havenever been of any use to him. Hence it comes that my house is in thehands of numberless marauders; for the chiefs from all theneighbouring islands, Dulichium, Same, Zacynthus, as also all theprincipal men of Ithaca itself, are eating up my house under thepretext of paying court to my mother, who will neither say point blankthat she will not marry, nor yet bring matters to an end, so theyare making havoc of my estate, and before long will do so withmyself into the bargain. The issue, however, rests with heaven. But doyou, old friend Eumaeus, go at once and tell Penelope that I am safeand have returned from Pylos. Tell it to herself alone, and thencome back here without letting any one else know, for there are manywho are plotting mischief against me."
4.  When she had thus made an end of praying, she handed the cup toTelemachus and he prayed likewise. By and by, when the outer meatswere roasted and had been taken off the spits, the carvers gaveevery man his portion and they all made an excellent dinner. As soonas they had had enough to eat and drink, Nestor, knight of Gerene,began to speak.
5.  "'When you shall have thus besought the ghosts with your prayers,offer them a ram and a black ewe, bending their heads towardsErebus; but yourself turn away from them as though you would maketowards the river. On this, many dead men's ghosts will come to you,and you must tell your men to skin the two sheep that you have justkilled, and offer them as a burnt sacrifice with prayers to Hadesand to Proserpine. Then draw your sword and sit there, so as toprevent any other poor ghost from coming near the split blood beforeTeiresias shall have answered your questions. The seer willpresently come to you, and will tell you about your voyage- whatstages you are to make, and how you are to sail the see so as to reachyour home.'
6.  "'That,' said he, 'I can soon do Any ghost that you let taste of theblood will talk with you like a reasonable being, but if you do notlet them have any blood they will go away again.'

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1.  "I am afraid of the gossip and scandal that may be set on footagainst me later on; for the people here are very ill-natured, andsome low fellow, if he met us, might say, 'Who is this fine-lookingstranger that is going about with Nausicaa? Where did she End him? Isuppose she is going to marry him. Perhaps he is a vagabond sailorwhom she has taken from some foreign vessel, for we have noneighbours; or some god has at last come down from heaven in answer toher prayers, and she is going to live with him all the rest of herlife. It would be a good thing if she would take herself of I for shand find a husband somewhere else, for she will not look at one of themany excellent young Phaeacians who are in with her.' This is the kindof disparaging remark that would be made about me, and I could notcomplain, for I should myself be scandalized at seeing any othergirl do the like, and go about with men in spite of everybody, whileher father and mother were still alive, and without having beenmarried in the face of all the world.
2.  "Good heavens," said he, "see how the gods have saved this manfrom destruction. We kept a succession of scouts upon the headlandsall day long, and when the sun was down we never went on shore tosleep, but waited in the ship all night till morning in the hope ofcapturing and killing him; but some god has conveyed him home in spiteof us. Let us consider how we can make an end of him. He must notescape us; our affair is never likely to come off while is alive,for he is very shrewd, and public feeling is by no means all on ourside. We must make haste before he can call the Achaeans inassembly; he will lose no time in doing so, for he will be furiouswith us, and will tell all the world how we plotted to kill him, butfailed to take him. The people will not like this when they come toknow of it; we must see that they do us no hurt, nor drive us from ourown country into exile. Let us try and lay hold of him either on hisfarm away from the town, or on the road hither. Then we can divideup his property amongst us, and let his mother and the man who marriesher have the house. If this does not please you, and you wishTelemachus to live on and hold his father's property, then we must notgather here and eat up his goods in this way, but must make our offersto Penelope each from his own house, and she can marry the man whowill give the most for her, and whose lot it is to win her."
3.  As she spoke she touched him with her golden wand. First she threw afair clean shirt and cloak about his shoulders; then she made himyounger and of more imposing presence; she gave him back his colour,filled out his cheeks, and let his beard become dark again. Then shewent away and Ulysses came back inside the hut. His son wasastounded when he saw him, and turned his eyes away for fear hemight be looking upon a god.
4.  "They all swore as I bade them, and when they had completed theiroath we made the ship fast in a harbour that was near a stream offresh water, and the men went ashore and cooked their suppers. As soonas they had had enough to eat and drink, they began talking abouttheir poor comrades whom Scylla had snatched up and eaten; this setthem weeping and they went on crying till they fell off into a soundsleep.
5.   Telemachus answered, "I can expect nothing of the kind; it wouldbe far too much to hope for. I dare not let myself think of it. Eventhough the gods themselves willed it no such good fortune could befallme."
6.  This was what they said, but they did not know what it was thathad been happening. The upper servant Eurynome washed and anointedUlysses in his own house and gave him a shirt and cloak, while Minervamade him look taller and stronger than before; she also made thehair grow thick on the top of his head, and flow down in curls likehyacinth blossoms; she glorified him about the head and shoulders justas a skilful workman who has studied art of all kinds under Vulcanor Minerva- and his work is full of beauty- enriches a piece of silverplate by gilding it. He came from the bath looking like one of theimmortals, and sat down opposite his wife on the seat he had left. "Mydear," said he, "heaven has endowed you with a heart more unyieldingthan woman ever yet had. No other woman could bear to keep away fromher husband when he had come back to her after twenty years ofabsence, and after having gone through so much. But come, nurse, get abed ready for me; I will sleep alone, for this woman has a heart ashard as iron."

应用

1.  "Eurymachus," Penelope answered, "people who persist in eating upthe estate of a great chieftain and dishonouring his house must notexpect others to think well of them. Why then should you mind if mentalk as you think they will? This stranger is strong and well-built,he says moreover that he is of noble birth. Give him the bow, andlet us see whether he can string it or no. I say- and it shallsurely be- that if Apollo vouchsafes him the glory of stringing it,I will give him a cloak and shirt of good wear, with a javelin to keepoff dogs and robbers, and a sharp sword. I will also give him sandals,and will see him sent safely whereever he wants to go."
2.  "Trust me for that," said she, "I will not lose sight of you whenonce we set about it, and I would imagine that some of those who aredevouring your substance will then bespatter the pavement with theirblood and brains. I will begin by disguising you so that no humanbeing shall know you; I will cover your body with wrinkles; youshall lose all your yellow hair; I will clothe you in a garment thatshall fill all who see it with loathing; I will blear your fine eyesfor you, and make you an unseemly object in the sight of thesuitors, of your wife, and of the son whom you left behind you. Thengo at once to the swineherd who is in charge of your pigs; he has beenalways well affected towards you, and is devoted to Penelope andyour son; you will find him feeding his pigs near the rock that iscalled Raven by the fountain Arethusa, where they are fattening onbeechmast and spring water after their manner. Stay with him andfind out how things are going, while I proceed to Sparta and seeyour son, who is with Menelaus at Lacedaemon, where he has gone to tryand find out whether you are still alive."
3.  Into this harbour, then, they took their ship, for they knew theplace, She had so much way upon her that she ran half her own lengthon to the shore; when, however, they had landed, the first thingthey did was to lift Ulysses with his rug and linen sheet out of theship, and lay him down upon the sand still fast asleep. Then they tookout the presents which Minerva had persuaded the Phaeacians to givehim when he was setting out on his voyage homewards. They put theseall together by the root of the olive tree, away from the road, forfear some passer by might come and steal them before Ulysses awoke;and then they made the best of their way home again.
4、  She went wondering back into the house, and laid her son's saying inher heart. Then, going upstairs with her handmaids into her room,she mourned her dear husband till Minerva shed sweet sleep over hereyes. But the suitors were clamorous throughout the covered cloisters,and prayed each one that he might be her bed fellow.
5、  "Thus they talked and evil counsels prevailed. They loosed the sack,whereupon the wind flew howling forth and raised a storm thatcarried us weeping out to sea and away from our own country. Then Iawoke, and knew not whether to throw myself into the sea or to live onand make the best of it; but I bore it, covered myself up, and laydown in the ship, while the men lamented bitterly as the fiercewinds bore our fleet back to the Aeolian island.

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  • 王纪锋 08-05

      "When Proserpine had dismissed the female ghosts in alldirections, the ghost of Agamemnon son of Atreus came sadly up tome,surrounded by those who had perished with him in the house ofAegisthus. As soon as he had tasted the blood he knew me, andweeping bitterly stretched out his arms towards me to embrace me;but he had no strength nor substance any more, and I too wept andpitied him as I beheld him. 'How did you come by your death,' saidI, 'King Agamemnon? Did Neptune raise his winds and waves againstyou when you were at sea, or did your enemies make an end of you onthe mainland when you were cattle-lifting or sheep-stealing, orwhile they were fighting in defence of their wives and city?'

  • 阿克巴汗 08-05

      "Ulysses, noble son of Laertes, so you would start home to yourown land at once? Good luck go with you, but if you could only knowhow much suffering is in store for you before you get back to your owncountry, you would stay where you are, keep house along with me, andlet me make you immortal, no matter how anxious you may be to see thiswife of yours, of whom you are thinking all the time day after day;yet I flatter myself that at am no whit less tall or well-looking thanshe is, for it is not to be expected that a mortal woman shouldcompare in beauty with an immortal."

  • 逄淋淋 08-05

       This made Minerva still more furious, so she scolded Ulysses veryangrily. "Ulysses," said she, "your strength and prowess are no longerwhat they were when you fought for nine long years among the Trojansabout the noble lady Helen. You killed many a man in those days, andit was through your stratagem that Priam's city was taken. How comesit that you are so lamentably less valiant now that you are on yourown ground, face to face with the suitors in your own house? Comeon, my good fellow, stand by my side and see how Mentor, son ofAlcinous shall fight your foes and requite your kindnesses conferredupon him."

  • 尼米兹 08-05

      "Queen Arete," he exclaimed, "daughter of great Rhexenor, in mydistress I humbly pray you, as also your husband and these your guests(whom may heaven prosper with long life and happiness, and may theyleave their possessions to their children, and all the honoursconferred upon them by the state) to help me home to my own country assoon as possible; for I have been long in trouble and away from myfriends."

  • 扎伊采夫 08-04

    {  Thus did he speak, and his words set them all a weeping. Helen wept,Telemachus wept, and so did Menelaus, nor could Pisistratus keep hiseyes from filling, when he remembered his dear brother Antilochus whomthe son of bright Dawn had killed. Thereon he said to Menelaus,

  • 李存福 08-03

      "As for me I live out of the way here with the pigs, and never go tothe town unless when Penelope sends for me on the arrival of some newsabout Ulysses. Then they all sit round and ask questions, both thosewho grieve over the king's absence, and those who rejoice at itbecause they can eat up his property without paying for it. For my ownpart I have never cared about asking anyone else since the time when Iwas taken in by an Aetolian, who had killed a man and come a longway till at last he reached my station, and I was very kind to him. Hesaid he had seen Ulysses with Idomeneus among the Cretans, refittinghis ships which had been damaged in a gale. He said Ulysses wouldreturn in the following summer or autumn with his men, and that hewould bring back much wealth. And now you, you unfortunate old man,since fate has brought you to my door, do not try to flatter me inthis way with vain hopes. It is not for any such reason that I shalltreat you kindly, but only out of respect for Jove the god ofhospitality, as fearing him and pitying you."}

  • 木·沙比尔 08-03

      Then Ulysses answered, "Madam, wife of Ulysses, do not disfigureyourself further by grieving thus bitterly for your loss, though I canhardly blame you for doing so. A woman who has loved her husband andborne him children, would naturally be grieved at losing him, eventhough he were a worse man than Ulysses, who they say was like agod. Still, cease your tears and listen to what I can tell I will hidenothing from you, and can say with perfect truth that I have latelyheard of Ulysses as being alive and on his way home; he is among theThesprotians, and is bringing back much valuable treasure that hehas begged from one and another of them; but his ship and all his crewwere lost as they were leaving the Thrinacian island, for Jove and thesun-god were angry with him because his men had slaughtered thesun-god's cattle, and they were all drowned to a man. But Ulyssesstuck to the keel of the ship and was drifted on to the land of thePhaecians, who are near of kin to the immortals, and who treated himas though he had been a god, giving him many presents, and wishingto escort him home safe and sound. In fact Ulysses would have beenhere long ago, had he not thought better to go from land to landgathering wealth; for there is no man living who is so wily as heis; there is no one can compare with him. Pheidon king of theThesprotians told me all this, and he swore to me- makingdrink-offerings in his house as he did so- that the ship was by thewater side and the crew found who would take Ulysses to his owncountry. He sent me off first, for there happened to be aThesprotian ship sailing for the wheat-growing island of Dulichium,but he showed me all treasure Ulysses had got together, and he hadenough lying in the house of king Pheidon to keep his family for tengenerations; but the king said Ulysses had gone to Dodona that hemight learn Jove's mind from the high oak tree, and know whether afterso long an absence he should return to Ithaca openly or in secret.So you may know he is safe and will be here shortly; he is close athand and cannot remain away from home much longer; nevertheless I willconfirm my words with an oath, and call Jove who is the first andmightiest of all gods to witness, as also that hearth of Ulysses towhich I have now come, that all I have spoken shall surely come topass. Ulysses will return in this self same year; with the end of thismoon and the beginning of the next he will be here."

  • 穆罕默德·赫加齐 08-03

      THEN Ulysses tore off his rags, and sprang on to the broadpavement with his bow and his quiver full of arrows. He shed thearrows on to the ground at his feet and said, "The mighty contest isat an end. I will now see whether Apollo will vouchsafe it to me tohit another mark which no man has yet hit."

  • 瑞特 08-02

       She went wondering back into the house, and laid her son's saying inher heart. Then, going upstairs with her handmaids into her room,she mourned her dear husband till Minerva shed sweet sleep over hereyes. But the suitors were clamorous throughout the covered cloisters,and prayed each one that he might be her bed fellow.

  • 赵清 07-31

    {  "The thing shall be done," exclaimed Alcinous, "as surely as I stilllive and reign over the Phaeacians. Our guest is indeed very anxiousto get home, still we must persuade him to remain with us untilto-morrow, by which time I shall be able to get together the whole sumthat I mean to give him. As regards- his escort it will be a matterfor you all, and mine above all others as the chief person among you."

  • 梭哈 07-31

      "'Look here, Cyclops,' said I, you have been eating a great dealof man's flesh, so take this and drink some wine, that you may seewhat kind of liquor we had on board my ship. I was bringing it toyou as a drink-offering, in the hope that you would take compassionupon me and further me on my way home, whereas all you do is to goon ramping and raving most intolerably. You ought to be ashamedyourself; how can you expect people to come see you any more if youtreat them in this way?'

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