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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:严维民 大小:GXOO79pL95140KB 下载:oLKqnmhj44854次
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日期:2020-08-06 07:04:46
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "Then Mercury went back to high Olympus passing over the woodedisland; but I fared onward to the house of Circe, and my heart wasclouded with care as I walked along. When I got to the gates I stoodthere and called the goddess, and as soon as she heard me she camedown, opened the door, and asked me to come in; so I followed her-much troubled in my mind. She set me on a richly decorated seat inlaidwith silver, there was a footstool also under my feet, and she mixed amess in a golden goblet for me to drink; but she drugged it, for shemeant me mischief. When she had given it me, and I had drunk itwithout its charming me, she struck she, struck me with her wand.'There now,' she cried, 'be off to the pigsty, and make your lair withthe rest of them.'
2.  "I spoke as movingly as I could, but they said nothing, till theirfather answered, 'Vilest of mankind, get you gone at once out of theisland; him whom heaven hates will I in no wise help. Be off, foryou come here as one abhorred of heaven. "And with these words he sentme sorrowing from his door.
3.  "When I had said this she went straight through the court with herwand in her hand and opened the pigsty doors. My men came out likeso many prime hogs and stood looking at her, but she went aboutamong them and anointed each with a second drug, whereon thebristles that the bad drug had given them fell off, and they becamemen again, younger than they were before, and much taller and betterlooking. They knew me at once, seized me each of them by the hand, andwept for joy till the whole house was filled with the sound of theirhullabalooing, and Circe herself was so sorry for them that she cameup to me and said, 'Ulysses, noble son of Laertes, go back at onceto the sea where you have left your ship, and first draw it on tothe land. Then, hide all your ship's gear and property in some cave,and come back here with your men.'
4.  Thus did they converse in the house of Hades deep down within thebowels of the earth. Meanwhile Ulysses and the others passed out ofthe town and soon reached the fair and well-tilled farm of Laertes,which he had reclaimed with infinite labour. Here was his house,with a lean-to running all round it, where the slaves who worked forhim slept and sat and ate, while inside the house there was an oldSicel woman, who looked after him in this his country-farm. WhenUlysses got there, he said to his son and to the other two:
5.  As he spoke he girded on his armour. Then he roused Telemachus,Philoetius, and Eumaeus, and told them all to put on their armouralso. This they did, and armed themselves. When they had done so, theyopened the gates and sallied forth, Ulysses leading the way. It wasnow daylight, but Minerva nevertheless concealed them in darknessand led them quickly out of the town.
6.  BOOK II.

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1.  "Menelaus," replied Telemachus, "I want to go home at once, for whenI came away I left my property without protection, and fear that whilelooking for my father I shall come to ruin myself, or find thatsomething valuable has been stolen during my absence."
2.  On this Asphalion, one of the servants, poured water over theirhands and they laid their hands on the good things that were beforethem.
3.  BOOK XX.
4.  "The first I saw was Tyro. She was daughter of Salmoneus and wife ofCretheus the son of Aeolus. She fell in love with the river Enipeuswho is much the most beautiful river in the whole world. Once when shewas taking a walk by his side as usual, Neptune, disguised as herlover, lay with her at the mouth of the river, and a huge blue wavearched itself like a mountain over them to hide both woman and god,whereon he loosed her virgin girdle and laid her in a deep slumber.When the god had accomplished the deed of love, he took her hand inhis own and said, 'Tyro, rejoice in all good will; the embraces of thegods are not fruitless, and you will have fine twins about this timetwelve months. Take great care of them. I am Neptune, so now gohome, but hold your tongue and do not tell any one.'
5.  "Happy Ulysses, son of Laertes," replied the ghost of Agamemnon,"you are indeed blessed in the possession of a wife endowed withsuch rare excellence of understanding, and so faithful to her weddedlord as Penelope the daughter of Icarius. The fame, therefore, ofher virtue shall never die, and the immortals shall compose a songthat shall be welcome to all mankind in honour of the constancy ofPenelope. How far otherwise was the wickedness of the daughter ofTyndareus who killed her lawful husband; her song shall be hatefulamong men, for she has brought disgrace on all womankind even on thegood ones."
6.  On this she led the way, and Ulysses followed in her steps; butnot one of the Phaecians could see him as he passed through the cityin the midst of them; for the great goddess Minerva in her good willtowards him had hidden him in a thick cloud of darkness. He admiredtheir harbours, ships, places of assembly, and the lofty walls ofthe city, which, with the palisade on top of them, were very striking,and when they reached the king's house Minerva said:

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1.  Now when the sun had set and darkness was over the land.
2.  On this he broke up the assembly, and every man went back to his ownabode, while the suitors returned to the house of Ulysses.
3.  "'My friends,' said he, 'I have had a dream from heaven in my sleep.We are a long way from the ships; I wish some one would go down andtell Agamemnon to send us up more men at once.'
4.  "'Be sure, therefore,' continued Agamemnon, 'and not be too friendlyeven with your own wife. Do not tell her all that you know perfectlywell yourself. Tell her a part only, and keep your own counsel aboutthe rest. Not that your wife, Ulysses, is likely to murder you, forPenelope is a very admirable woman, and has an excellent nature. Weleft her a young bride with an infant at her breast when we set outfor Troy. This child no doubt is now grown up happily to man's estate,and he and his father will have a joyful meeting and embrace oneanother as it is right they should do, whereas my wicked wife didnot even allow me the happiness of looking upon my son, but killedme ere I could do so. Furthermore I say- and lay my saying to yourheart- do not tell people when you are bringing your ship to Ithaca,but steal a march upon them, for after all this there is no trustingwomen. But now tell me, and tell me true, can you give me any newsof my son Orestes? Is he in Orchomenus, or at Pylos, or is he atSparta with Menelaus- for I presume that he is still living.'
5.   "I was told all this by Calypso, who said she had heard it fromthe mouth of Mercury.
6.  When she heard the sure proofs Ulysses now gave her, she fairlybroke down. She flew weeping to his side, flung her arms about hisneck, and kissed him. "Do not be angry with me Ulysses," she cried,"you, who are the wisest of mankind. We have suffered, both of us.Heaven has denied us the happiness of spending our youth, and ofgrowing old, together; do not then be aggrieved or take it amissthat I did not embrace you thus as soon as I saw you. I have beenshuddering all the time through fear that someone might come hereand deceive me with a lying story; for there are many very wickedpeople going about. Jove's daughter Helen would never have yieldedherself to a man from a foreign country, if she had known that thesons of Achaeans would come after her and bring her back. Heaven putit in her heart to do wrong, and she gave no thought to that sin,which has been the source of all our sorrows. Now, however, that youhave convinced me by showing that you know all about our bed (which nohuman being has ever seen but you and I and a single maid servant, thedaughter of Actor, who was given me by my father on my marriage, andwho keeps the doors of our room) hard of belief though I have been Ican mistrust no longer."

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1.  This was what she said, and Ulysses was glad when he heard hertrying to get presents out of the suitors, and flattering them withfair words which he knew she did not mean.
2.  "Here I am, my dear sir," said he, "stay your hand therefore, andtell your father, or he will kill me in his rage against the suitorsfor having wasted his substance and been so foolishly disrespectful toyourself."
3.  Ulysses answered, "Madam, I have foresworn rugs and blankets fromthe day that I left the snowy ranges of Crete to go on shipboard. Iwill lie as I have lain on many a sleepless night hitherto. Nightafter night have I passed in any rough sleeping place, and waitedfor morning. Nor, again, do I like having my feet washed; I shallnot let any of the young hussies about your house touch my feet;but, if you have any old and respectable woman who has gone through asmuch trouble as I have, I will allow her to wash them."
4、  With these words she made them all want to come, and they flocked tothe assembly till seats and standing room were alike crowded. Everyone was struck with the appearance of Ulysses, for Minerva hadbeautified him about the head and shoulders, making him look tallerand stouter than he really was, that he might impress the Phaeciansfavourably as being a very remarkable man, and might come off wellin the many trials of skill to which they would challenge him. Then,when they were got together, Alcinous spoke:
5、  "This hound," answered Eumaeus, "belonged to him who has died in afar country. If he were what he was when Ulysses left for Troy, hewould soon show you what he could do. There was not a wild beast inthe forest that could get away from him when he was once on itstracks. But now he has fallen on evil times, for his master is deadand gone, and the women take no care of him. Servants never do theirwork when their master's hand is no longer over them, for Jove takeshalf the goodness out of a man when he makes a slave of him."

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  • 千颂伊 08-05

      "Therefore, Sir, do you on your part affect no more concealmentnor reserve in the matter about which I shall ask you; it will be morepolite in you to give me a plain answer; tell me the name by whichyour father and mother over yonder used to call you, and by whichyou were known among your neighbours and fellow-citizens. There isno one, neither rich nor poor, who is absolutely without any namewhatever, for people's fathers and mothers give them names as soonas they are born. Tell me also your country, nation, and city, thatour ships may shape their purpose accordingly and take you there.For the Phaeacians have no pilots; their vessels have no rudders asthose of other nations have, but the ships themselves understandwhat it is that we are thinking about and want; they know all thecities and countries in the whole world, and can traverse the sea justas well even when it is covered with mist and cloud, so that thereis no danger of being wrecked or coming to any harm. Still I doremember hearing my father say that Neptune was angry with us forbeing too easy-going in the matter of giving people escorts. He saidthat one of these days he should wreck a ship of ours as it wasreturning from having escorted some one, and bury our city under ahigh mountain. This is what my used to say, but whether the god willcarry out his threat or no is a matter which he will decide forhimself.

  • 李丽伟 08-05

      "My mother," answered Telemachus, tells me I am son to Ulysses,but it is a wise child that knows his own father. Would that I wereson to one who had grown old upon his own estates, for, since youask me, there is no more ill-starred man under heaven than he who theytell me is my father."

  • 余曦 08-05

       "I stuck to the ship till the sea knocked her sides from her keel(which drifted about by itself) and struck the mast out of her inthe direction of the keel; but there was a backstay of stoutox-thong still hanging about it, and with this I lashed the mast andkeel together, and getting astride of them was carried wherever thewinds chose to take me.

  • 史蒂夫-纳什 08-05

      "Alcinous," answered Ulysses, "there is a time for makingspeeches, and a time for going to bed; nevertheless, since you sodesire, I will not refrain from telling you the still sadder tale ofthose of my comrades who did not fall fighting with the Trojans, butperished on their return, through the treachery of a wicked woman.

  • 王大可 08-04

    {  Now there was a trap door on the wall, while at one end of thepavement there was an exit leading to a narrow passage, and thisexit was closed by a well-made door. Ulysses told Philoetius tostand by this door and guard it, for only one person could attack itat a time. But Agelaus shouted out, "Cannot some one go up to the trapdoor and tell the people what is going on? Help would come at once,and we should soon make an end of this man and his shooting."

  • 潘乙宁 08-03

      Then with both hands he took what Telemachus had sent him, andlaid it on the dirty old wallet at his feet. He went on eating itwhile the bard was singing, and had just finished his dinner as heleft off. The suitors applauded the bard, whereon Minerva went up toUlysses and prompted him to beg pieces of bread from each one of thesuitors, that he might see what kind of people they were, and tell thegood from the bad; but come what might she was not going to save asingle one of them. Ulysses, therefore, went on his round, goingfrom left to right, and stretched out his hands to beg as though hewere a real beggar. Some of them pitied him, and were curious abouthim, asking one another who he was and where he came from; whereon thegoatherd Melanthius said, "Suitors of my noble mistress, I can tellyou something about him, for I have seen him before. The swineherdbrought him here, but I know nothing about the man himself, norwhere he comes from."}

  • 黄志刚 08-03

      "You are always taking something of that sort into your head,"replied Minerva, "and that is why I cannot desert you in yourafflictions; you are so plausible, shrewd and shifty. Any one butyourself on returning from so long a voyage would at once have gonehome to see his wife and children, but you do not seem to care aboutasking after them or hearing any news about them till you haveexploited your wife, who remains at home vainly grieving for you,and having no peace night or day for the tears she sheds on yourbehalf. As for my not coming near you, I was never uneasy about you,for I was certain you would get back safely though you would loseall your men, and I did not wish to quarrel with my uncle Neptune, whonever forgave you for having blinded his son. I will now, however,point out to you the lie of the land, and you will then perhapsbelieve me. This is the haven of the old merman Phorcys, and here isthe olive tree that grows at the head of it; [near it is the cavesacred to the Naiads;] here too is the overarching cavern in which youhave offered many an acceptable hecatomb to the nymphs, and this isthe wooded mountain Neritum."

  • 孟泰龄 08-03

      "I was told all this by Calypso, who said she had heard it fromthe mouth of Mercury.

  • 王诗龄 08-02

       "Some things, Telemachus," answered Minerva, "will be suggested toyou by your own instinct, and heaven will prompt you further; for I amassured that the gods have been with you from the time of your birthuntil now."

  • 叶璇 07-31

    {  "We were frightened out of our senses by his loud voice andmonstrous form, but I managed to say, 'We are Achaeans on our way homefrom Troy, but by the will of Jove, and stress of weather, we havebeen driven far out of our course. We are the people of Agamemnon, sonof Atreus, who has won infinite renown throughout the whole world,by sacking so great a city and killing so many people. We thereforehumbly pray you to show us some hospitality, and otherwise make ussuch presents as visitors may reasonably expect. May your excellencyfear the wrath of heaven, for we are your suppliants, and Jove takesall respectable travellers under his protection, for he is the avengerof all suppliants and foreigners in distress.'

  • 步瑞琪 07-31

      Now when the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared,Nestor left his couch and took his seat on the benches of white andpolished marble that stood in front of his house. Here aforetime satNeleus, peer of gods in counsel, but he was now dead, and had goneto the house of Hades; so Nestor sat in his seat, sceptre in hand,as guardian of the public weal. His sons as they left their roomsgathered round him, Echephron, Stratius, Perseus, Aretus, andThrasymedes; the sixth son was Pisistratus, and when Telemachus joinedthem they made him sit with them. Nestor then addressed them.

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