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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:张哲 大小:D7mG3K0C42764KB 下载:2bjMFppe95891次
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日期:2020-08-12 07:11:59
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李坤龙

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "Now," said he, "that our guests have done their dinner, it willbe best to ask them who they are. Who, then, sir strangers, are you,and from what port have you sailed? Are you traders? or do you sailthe seas as rovers with your hand against every man, and every man'shand against you?"
2.  "He said this to draw me out, but I was too cunning to be caughtin that way, so I answered with a lie; 'Neptune,' said I, 'sent myship on to the rocks at the far end of your country, and wrecked it.We were driven on to them from the open sea, but I and those who arewith me escaped the jaws of death.'
3.  Then Ulysses answered, "Madam, wife of Ulysses, do not disfigureyourself further by grieving thus bitterly for your loss, though I canhardly blame you for doing so. A woman who has loved her husband andborne him children, would naturally be grieved at losing him, eventhough he were a worse man than Ulysses, who they say was like agod. Still, cease your tears and listen to what I can tell I will hidenothing from you, and can say with perfect truth that I have latelyheard of Ulysses as being alive and on his way home; he is among theThesprotians, and is bringing back much valuable treasure that hehas begged from one and another of them; but his ship and all his crewwere lost as they were leaving the Thrinacian island, for Jove and thesun-god were angry with him because his men had slaughtered thesun-god's cattle, and they were all drowned to a man. But Ulyssesstuck to the keel of the ship and was drifted on to the land of thePhaecians, who are near of kin to the immortals, and who treated himas though he had been a god, giving him many presents, and wishingto escort him home safe and sound. In fact Ulysses would have beenhere long ago, had he not thought better to go from land to landgathering wealth; for there is no man living who is so wily as heis; there is no one can compare with him. Pheidon king of theThesprotians told me all this, and he swore to me- makingdrink-offerings in his house as he did so- that the ship was by thewater side and the crew found who would take Ulysses to his owncountry. He sent me off first, for there happened to be aThesprotian ship sailing for the wheat-growing island of Dulichium,but he showed me all treasure Ulysses had got together, and he hadenough lying in the house of king Pheidon to keep his family for tengenerations; but the king said Ulysses had gone to Dodona that hemight learn Jove's mind from the high oak tree, and know whether afterso long an absence he should return to Ithaca openly or in secret.So you may know he is safe and will be here shortly; he is close athand and cannot remain away from home much longer; nevertheless I willconfirm my words with an oath, and call Jove who is the first andmightiest of all gods to witness, as also that hearth of Ulysses towhich I have now come, that all I have spoken shall surely come topass. Ulysses will return in this self same year; with the end of thismoon and the beginning of the next he will be here."
4.  With this he left them to come on at their leisure, while he wentquickly forward and soon reached the house of his master. When hegot there he went in and took his seat among the suitors oppositeEurymachus, who liked him better than any of the others. Theservants brought him a portion of meat, and an upper woman servant setbread before him that he might eat. Presently Ulysses and theswineherd came up to the house and stood by it, amid a sound of music,for Phemius was just beginning to sing to the suitors. Then Ulyssestook hold of the swineherd's hand, and said:
5.  "But Polyphemus shouted to them from inside the cave, 'Noman iskilling me by fraud! Noman is killing me by force!'
6.  "I will tell you everything," answered Ulysses, "quite truly. I comefrom Alybas, where I have a fine house. I am son of king Apheidas, whois the son of Polypemon. My own name is Eperitus; heaven drove meoff my course as I was leaving Sicania, and I have been carried hereagainst my will. As for my ship it is lying over yonder, off theopen country outside the town, and this is the fifth year sinceUlysses left my country. Poor fellow, yet the omens were good forhim when he left me. The birds all flew on our right hands, and bothhe and I rejoiced to see them as we parted, for we had every hope thatwe should have another friendly meeting and exchange presents."

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1.  NOW when the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared,Alcinous and Ulysses both rose, and Alcinous led the way to thePhaecian place of assembly, which was near the ships. When they gotthere they sat down side by side on a seat of polished stone, whileMinerva took the form of one of Alcinous' servants, and went round thetown in order to help Ulysses to get home. She went up to thecitizens, man by man, and said, "Aldermen and town councillors ofthe Phaeacians, come to the assembly all of you and listen to thestranger who has just come off a long voyage to the house of KingAlcinous; he looks like an immortal god."
2.  So here Ulysses stood for a while and looked about him, but whenhe had looked long enough he crossed the threshold and went within theprecincts of the house. There he found all the chief people amongthe Phaecians making their drink-offerings to Mercury, which theyalways did the last thing before going away for the night. He wentstraight through the court, still hidden by the cloak of darkness inwhich Minerva had enveloped him, till he reached Arete and KingAlcinous; then he laid his hands upon the knees of the queen, and atthat moment the miraculous darkness fell away from him and he becamevisible. Every one was speechless with surprise at seeing a man there,but Ulysses began at once with his petition.
3.  The suitors all came up laughing, and gathered round the tworagged tramps. "Listen to me," said Antinous, "there are some goats'paunches down at the fire, which we have filled with blood and fat,and set aside for supper; he who is victorious and proves himself tobe the better man shall have his pick of the lot; he shall be freeof our table and we will not allow any other beggar about the house atall."
4.  To this you answered, O swineherd Eumaeus, "Poor unhappy stranger, Ihave found the story of your misfortunes extremely interesting, butthat part about Ulysses is not right; and you will never get me tobelieve it. Why should a man like you go about telling lies in thisway? I know all about the return of my master. The gods one and all ofthem detest him, or they would have taken him before Troy, or lethim die with friends around him when the days of his fighting weredone; for then the Achaeans would have built a mound over his ashesand his son would have been heir to his renown, but now the stormwinds have spirited him away we know not whither.
5.  "This was what she said, and we assented; whereon we could see herworking on her great web all day long, but at night she would unpickthe stitches again by torchlight. She fooled us in this way forthree years and we never found her out, but as time wore on and shewas now in her fourth year, one of her maids who knew what she wasdoing told us, and we caught her in the act of undoing her work, soshe had to finish it whether she would or no. The suitors,therefore, make you this answer, that both you and the Achaeans mayunderstand-'Send your mother away, and bid her marry the man of herown and of her father's choice'; for I do not know what will happen ifshe goes on plaguing us much longer with the airs she gives herself onthe score of the accomplishments Minerva has taught her, and becauseshe is so clever. We never yet heard of such a woman; we know allabout Tyro, Alcmena, Mycene, and the famous women of old, but theywere nothing to your mother, any one of them. It was not fair of herto treat us in that way, and as long as she continues in the mind withwhich heaven has now endowed her, so long shall we go on eating upyour estate; and I do not see why she should change, for she getsall the honour and glory, and it is you who pay for it, not she.Understand, then, that we will not go back to our lands, neitherhere nor elsewhere, till she has made her choice and married someone or other of us."
6.  With this he drove his goodly steeds back to the city of the Pyliansand soon reached his home, but Telemachus called the men togetherand gave his orders. "Now, my men," said he, "get everything inorder on board the ship, and let us set out home."

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1.  "She is still at the house," replied Eumaeus, "grieving and breakingher heart, and doing nothing but weep, both night and daycontinually."
2.  "He said this to draw me out, but I was too cunning to be caughtin that way, so I answered with a lie; 'Neptune,' said I, 'sent myship on to the rocks at the far end of your country, and wrecked it.We were driven on to them from the open sea, but I and those who arewith me escaped the jaws of death.'
3.  "Father, let me bring you a shield, two spears, and a brass helmetfor your temples. I will arm myself as well, and will bring otherarmour for the swineherd and the stockman, for we had better bearmed."
4.  Thus did they converse, and presently the swineherds came up withthe pigs, which were then shut up for the night in their sties, anda tremendous squealing they made as they were being driven intothem. But Eumaeus called to his men and said, "Bring in the best pigyou have, that I may sacrifice for this stranger, and we will taketoll of him ourselves. We have had trouble enough this long timefeeding pigs, while others reap the fruit of our labour."
5.   "I will tell you then truth," replied her son. "We went to Pylos andsaw Nestor, who took me to his house and treated me as hospitably asthough I were a son of his own who had just returned after a longabsence; so also did his sons; but he said he had not heard a wordfrom any human being about Ulysses, whether he was alive or dead. Hesent me, therefore, with a chariot and horses to Menelaus. There I sawHelen, for whose sake so many, both Argives and Trojans, were inheaven's wisdom doomed to suffer. Menelaus asked me what it was thathad brought me to Lacedaemon, and I told him the whole truth,whereon he said, 'So, then, these cowards would usurp a brave man'sbed? A hind might as well lay her new-born young in the lair of alion, and then go off to feed in the forest or in some grassy dell.The lion, when he comes back to his lair, will make short work withthe pair of them, and so will Ulysses with these suitors. By fatherJove, Minerva, and Apollo, if Ulysses is still the man that he waswhen he wrestled with Philomeleides in Lesbos, and threw him soheavily that all the Greeks cheered him- if he is still such, and wereto come near these suitors, they would have a short shrift and a sorrywedding. As regards your question, however, I will not prevaricate nordeceive you, but what the old man of the sea told me, so much will Itell you in full. He said he could see Ulysses on an islandsorrowing bitterly in the house of the nymph Calypso, who waskeeping him prisoner, and he could not reach his home, for he had noships nor sailors to take him over the sea.' This was what Menelaustold me, and when I had heard his story I came away; the gods thengave me a fair wind and soon brought me safe home again."
6.  To this Penelope replied, "Eurymachus, heaven robbed me of all mybeauty whether of face or figure when the Argives set sail for Troyand my dear husband with them. If he were to return and look aftermy affairs, I should both be more respected and show a better presenceto the world. As it is, I am oppressed with care, and with theafflictions which heaven has seen fit to heap upon me. My husbandforesaw it all, and when he was leaving home he took my right wrist inhis hand- 'Wife, 'he said, 'we shall not all of us come safe homefrom Troy, for the Trojans fight well both with bow and spear. Theyare excellent also at fighting from chariots, and nothing decidesthe issue of a fight sooner than this. I know not, therefore,whether heaven will send me back to you, or whether I may not fallover there at Troy. In the meantime do you look after things here.Take care of my father and mother as at present, and even more soduring my absence, but when you see our son growing a beard, thenmarry whom you will, and leave this your present home. This is what hesaid and now it is all coming true. A night will come when I shallhave to yield myself to a marriage which I detest, for Jove hastaken from me all hope of happiness. This further grief, moreover,cuts me to the very heart. You suitors are not wooing me after thecustom of my country. When men are courting a woman who they thinkwill be a good wife to them and who is of noble birth, and when theyare each trying to win her for himself, they usually bring oxen andsheep to feast the friends of the lady, and they make hermagnificent presents, instead of eating up other people's propertywithout paying for it."

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1.  "Menelaus, son of Atreus, and you my good friends, sons ofhonourable men (which is as Jove wills, for he is the giver both ofgood and evil, and can do what he chooses), feast here as you will,and listen while I tell you a tale in season. I cannot indeed nameevery single one of the exploits of Ulysses, but I can say what he didwhen he was before Troy, and you Achaeans were in all sorts ofdifficulties. He covered himself with wounds and bruises, dressedhimself all in rags, and entered the enemy's city looking like amenial or a beggar. and quite different from what he did when he wasamong his own people. In this disguise he entered the city of Troy,and no one said anything to him. I alone recognized him and began toquestion him, but he was too cunning for me. When, however, I hadwashed and anointed him and had given him clothes, and after I hadsworn a solemn oath not to betray him to the Trojans till he had gotsafely back to his own camp and to the ships, he told me all thatthe Achaeans meant to do. He killed many Trojans and got muchinformation before he reached the Argive camp, for all which thingsthe Trojan women made lamentation, but for my own part I was glad, formy heart was beginning to oam after my home, and I was unhappy aboutwrong that Venus had done me in taking me over there, away from mycountry, my girl, and my lawful wedded husband, who is indeed by nomeans deficient either in person or understanding."
2.  But Ulysses did not know what to think. "Alas," he said to himselfin his dismay, "this is only some one or other of the gods who isluring me to ruin by advising me to will quit my raft. At any rate Iwill not do so at present, for the land where she said I should bequit of all troubles seemed to be still a good way off. I know whatI will do- I am sure it will be best- no matter what happens I willstick to the raft as long as her timbers hold together, but when thesea breaks her up I will swim for it; I do not see how I can do anybetter than this."
3.  But Pisistratus said, "No matter what hurry we are in we cannotdrive in the dark. It will be morning soon; wait till Menelaus hasbrought his presents and put them in the chariot for us; and let himsay good-bye to us in the usual way. So long as he lives a guestshould never forget a host who has shown him kindness."
4、  "If, therefore, you want my father to give you an escort and to helpyou home, do as I bid you; you will see a beautiful grove of poplarsby the road side dedicated to Minerva; it has a well in it and ameadow all round it. Here my father has a field of rich garden ground,about as far from the town as a man' voice will carry. Sit downthere and wait for a while till the rest of us can get into the townand reach my father's house. Then, when you think we must have donethis, come into the town and ask the way to the house of my fatherAlcinous. You will have no difficulty in finding it; any child willpoint it out to you, for no one else in the whole town has anythinglike such a fine house as he has. When you have got past the gates andthrough the outer court, go right across the inner court till you cometo my mother. You will find her sitting by the fire and spinning herpurple wool by firelight. It is a fine sight to see her as she leansback against one of the bearing-posts with her maids all ranged behindher. Close to her seat stands that of my father, on which he sitsand topes like an immortal god. Never mind him, but go up to mymother, and lay your hands upon her knees if you would get homequickly. If you can gain her over, you may hope to see your owncountry again, no matter how distant it may be."
5、  As he spoke he girded on his armour. Then he roused Telemachus,Philoetius, and Eumaeus, and told them all to put on their armouralso. This they did, and armed themselves. When they had done so, theyopened the gates and sallied forth, Ulysses leading the way. It wasnow daylight, but Minerva nevertheless concealed them in darknessand led them quickly out of the town.

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  • 李盾 08-11

      "I was told all this by Calypso, who said she had heard it fromthe mouth of Mercury.

  • 朱斥 08-11

      "When I had nearly got back to the ship some god took pity upon mysolitude, and sent a fine antlered stag right into the middle of mypath. He was coming down his pasture in the forest to drink of theriver, for the heat of the sun drove him, and as he passed I struckhim in the middle of the back; the bronze point of the spear wentclean through him, and he lay groaning in the dust until the life wentout of him. Then I set my foot upon him, drew my spear from the wound,and laid it down; I also gathered rough grass and rushes and twistedthem into a fathom or so of good stout rope, with which I bound thefour feet of the noble creature together; having so done I hung himround my neck and walked back to the ship leaning upon my spear, forthe stag was much too big for me to be able to carry him on myshoulder, steadying him with one hand. As I threw him down in front ofthe ship, I called the men and spoke cheeringly man by man to eachof them. 'Look here my friends,' said I, 'we are not going to die somuch before our time after all, and at any rate we will not starveso long as we have got something to eat and drink on board.' On thisthey uncovered their heads upon the sea shore and admired the stag,for he was indeed a splendid fellow. Then, when they had feasted theireyes upon him sufficiently, they washed their hands and began tocook him for dinner.

  • 吴玉国 08-11

       When the bright star that heralds the approach of dawn began toshow. the ship drew near to land. Now there is in Ithaca a haven ofthe old merman Phorcys, which lies between two points that break theline of the sea and shut the harbour in. These shelter it from thestorms of wind and sea that rage outside, so that, when once withinit, a ship may lie without being even moored. At the head of thisharbour there is a large olive tree, and at no distance a fineoverarching cavern sacred to the nymphs who are called Naiads. Thereare mixing-bowls within it and wine-jars of stone, and the bees hivethere. Moreover, there are great looms of stone on which the nymphsweave their robes of sea purple- very curious to see- and at all timesthere is water within it. It has two entrances, one facing North bywhich mortals can go down into the cave, while the other comes fromthe South and is more mysterious; mortals cannot possibly get in byit, it is the way taken by the gods.

  • 崔小波 08-11

      On this the women came down in a body, weeping and wailing bitterly.First they carried the dead bodies out, and propped them up againstone another in the gatehouse. Ulysses ordered them about and made themdo their work quickly, so they had to carry the bodies out. Whenthey had done this, they cleaned all the tables and seats with spongesand water, while Telemachus and the two others shovelled up theblood and dirt from the ground, and the women carried it all awayand put it out of doors. Then when they had made the whole place quiteclean and orderly, they took the women out and hemmed them in thenarrow space between the wall of the domed room and that of theyard, so that they could not get away: and Telemachus said to theother two, "I shall not let these women die a clean death, for theywere insolent to me and my mother, and used to sleep with thesuitors."

  • 彭厝 08-10

    {  "My sons," said he, "make haste to do as I shall bid you. I wishfirst and foremost to propitiate the great goddess Minerva, whomanifested herself visibly to me during yesterday's festivities. Go,then, one or other of you to the plain, tell the stockman to look meout a heifer, and come on here with it at once. Another must go toTelemachus's ship, and invite all the crew, leaving two men only incharge of the vessel. Some one else will run and fetch Laerceus thegoldsmith to gild the horns of the heifer. The rest, stay all of youwhere you are; tell the maids in the house to prepare an excellentdinner, and to fetch seats, and logs of wood for a burnt offering.Tell them also- to bring me some clear spring water."

  • 施力 08-09

      Then Alcinous told Laodamas and Halius to dance alone, for there wasno one to compete with them. So they took a red ball which Polybus hadmade for them, and one of them bent himself backwards and threw itup towards the clouds, while the other jumped from off the groundand caught it with ease before it came down again. When they haddone throwing the ball straight up into the air they began to dance,and at the same time kept on throwing it backwards and forwards to oneanother, while all the young men in the ring applauded and made agreat stamping with their feet. Then Ulysses said:}

  • 徐某 08-09

      So here Ulysses stood for a while and looked about him, but whenhe had looked long enough he crossed the threshold and went within theprecincts of the house. There he found all the chief people amongthe Phaecians making their drink-offerings to Mercury, which theyalways did the last thing before going away for the night. He wentstraight through the court, still hidden by the cloak of darkness inwhich Minerva had enveloped him, till he reached Arete and KingAlcinous; then he laid his hands upon the knees of the queen, and atthat moment the miraculous darkness fell away from him and he becamevisible. Every one was speechless with surprise at seeing a man there,but Ulysses began at once with his petition.

  • 王啸坤 08-09

      "Father," replied Telemachus, "you will come to know me by and by,and when you do you will find that I can keep your counsel. I do notthink, however, the plan you propose will turn out well for eitherof us. Think it over. It will take us a long time to go the round ofthe farms and exploit the men, and all the time the suitors will bewasting your estate with impunity and without compunction. Prove thewomen by all means, to see who are disloyal and who guiltless, but Iam not in favour of going round and trying the men. We can attend tothat later on, if you really have some sign from Jove that he willsupport you."

  • 赵玉芝 08-08

       BOOK VI.

  • 邵喜珍 08-06

    {  "Ill deeds do not prosper, and the weak confound the strong. See howlimping Vulcan, lame as he is, has caught Mars who is the fleetest godin heaven; and now Mars will be cast in heavy damages."

  • 卢展工 08-06

      As he spoke Jove sent two eagles from the top of the mountain, andthey flew on and on with the wind, sailing side by side in their ownlordly flight. When they were right over the middle of the assemblythey wheeled and circled about, beating the air with their wings andglaring death into the eyes of them that were below; then, fightingfiercely and tearing at one another, they flew off towards the rightover the town. The people wondered as they saw them, and asked eachother what an this might be; whereon Halitherses, who was the bestprophet and reader of omens among them, spoke to them plainly and inall honesty, saying:

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