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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:慈铭 大小:oJyFRcYQ41019KB 下载:a8qEeKtB37216次
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日期:2020-08-08 23:17:59
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姬兆亮

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  And all in honour of the Spring.This Song, most sweetly sung by Madame Neiphila, was especiallycommended, both by the King, and all the rest of the Ladies. Whichbeing fully finished, the King gave oder, that everie one shouldrepaire to their Chambers, because a great part of the night wasalready spent.
2.  If the former Novels had made all the Ladies sad and sighe, thislast of Dioneus as much delighted them, as restoring them to theirformer jocond humor, and banishing Tragicall discourse for ever. TheKing perceiving that the Sun was neere setting, and his governmentas neere ending, with many kinde and courteous speeches, excusedhimselfe to the Ladies, for being the motive of such an argument, asexpressed the infelicity of poore Lovers. And having finished hisexcuse, up he rose, taking the Crown of Lawrell from off his ownehead, the Ladies awaiting on whose head he pleased next to set it,which proved to be the gracious Lady Fiammetta, and thus he spake.Here I place this Crowne on her head, that knoweth better then anyother, how to comfort this faire assembly to morrow, for the sorrowwhich they have this day endured.
3.  The President being desirous to make the boy his, the Count (whosedayly prayers were to the same purpose) frankly gave his Son to theNobleman: albeit naturall and fatherly affection, urged someunwillingnesse to part so with him; yet necessity and discretion,found it best for the benefit of them both. Being thus eased of carefor his Son and Daughter, and they (though in different places) yetunder good and worthy government; the Count would continue no longerin England: but, as best hee could procure the meanes, passed overinto Ireland, and being arrived at a place called Stanford, becameservant to an Earle of that Country, a Gentleman professing Armes,on whom he attended as a serving man, and lived a long while in thatestate very painfully.
4.  being come to the house, and kindly welcommed by the wife: they wereno sooner gone up the staires, and entering in at the Chamber doore;but the Woman heard her Husband cough, and also his comming up thestaires. Alas deare Spinelloccio (quoth she) what shall we do? MyHusband is comming uppe, and we shall be both taken tardie, stepinto this Chest, lye downe there and stirre not, till I have senthim forth againe, which shall be within a very short while.Spinelloccio was not a little joyfull for her good advice; downe inthe Chest lay he, and she lockt him in: by which time Zeppa was entredthe Chamber. Where are you Wife? said he, (speaking so loud, as hee inthe Chest might heare him) What, is it time to go to dinner? It willbe anon Sir, answered she, as yet it is overearly but seeing you arecome, the more hast shall be made, and every thing will be readyquickly.
5.  Some indifferent space of time before, the beauty, manners, andwell-seeming vertues, of a poore Countrie-mans daughter, dwelling inno farre distant village, had appeared very pleasing to the LordMarquesse, and gave him full perswasion, that with her hee should leada comfortable life. And therefore without any further search orinquisition, he absolutely resolved to marry her, and having conferredwith her Father, agreed, that his daughter should be his wife.Whereupon, the Marquesse made a generall convocation of all his Lords,Barons, and other of his especiall friends, from all parts of hisDominion; and when they were assembled together, hee then spake untothem in manner as followeth.Honourable friends, it appeared pleasing to you all, and yet (Ithinke) you are of the same minde, that I should dispose my selfe totake a wife: and I thereto condescended, more to yeeld youcontentment, then for any particular desire in my selfe. Let mee nowremember you of your solemne made promise, with full consent tohonor and obey her (whosoever) as your Soveraigne Lady andMistresse, that I shall elect to make my wife: and now the time iscome, for my exacting the performance of that promise, and which Ilook you must constantly keepe. I have made choyce of a yongvirgine, answerable to mine owne heart and liking, dwelling notfarre off hence, whom I intend to make my wife, and (within few dales)to have her brought home to my Pallace. Let your care and diligencethen extend so farre, as to see that the feast may be sumptuous, andher entertainment to bee most honourable: to the end that I mayreceive as much contentment in your promise performed, as you shallperceive I doe in my choice.
6.  Why am I thus restrainde?

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1.  Now, although it seemed a most severe imposition, for Albert topasse in any of these disguises: yet his exceeding feare ofLisettaes brethren and friends, made him gladly yeelde, and to undergowhat shape the poore man pleased, which thus he ordered. Annointinghis naked body with Hony, he then covered it over with downy smallFeathers, and fastening a chaine about his necke, and a strange uglyvizard on his face, he gave him a great staffe in the one hand, andtwo huge Mastive dogs chained together in the other, which he hadborrowed in the Butchery. Afterward, he sent a man to the Rialto,who there proclaimed by the sound of Trumpet: That all such as desiredto see God Cupid, which the last nights had descended downe from theskies, and fell (by ill hap) into the Venetian gulfe, let them repaireto the publike Market place of S. Marke, and there he would appeare inhis owne likenesse.
2.  In those ancient and reverend dayes, wherof I am now to speake,the high renowne and admirable wisedome of Salomon, King of GreatBrittain, was most famous throughout all parts of the world; foranswering all doubtfull questions and demaunds whatsoever, thatpossibly could be propounded to him. So that many resorted to him,from the most remote and furthest off countreyes, to heare hismiraculous knowledge and experience, yea, and to crave his counsell,in matters of greatest importance. Among the rest of them whichrepaired thither, was a rich yong Gentleman, honourably descended,named Melisso, who came from the City of Laiazzo, where he was bothborne, and dwelt.
3.  Pedro, who was young, and likewise Violenta, went farre more lightlythen her Mother and her company, as much perhaps provoked by love,as feare of the sudden raine falling, and paced on so fast beforethem, that they were wholly out of sight. After many flashes oflightning, and a few dreadfull clappes of thunder, there fell such atempestuous showre of hayle, as compelled the Mother and her traine toshelter themselves in a poore Countrey-mans Cottage. Pedro andViolenta, having no other refuge, ranne likewise into a pooreSheepecoate, so over-ruined, as it was in danger to fall on theirheads; and no body dwelt in it, neither stood any other house neereit, and it was scarsely any shelter for them, howbeit, necessityenforceth to make shift with the meanest. The storme encreasing moreand more, and they coveting to avoyd it as well as they could;sighes and drie hemmes were often inter-vented, as dumbly (before)they were wont to doe, when willingly they could affoord another kindeof speaking.
4.  Calandrino stampt and fretted exceedingly, saying: As I am a trueman to God, my Prince, and Countrey, I tell thee truly, that my Brawneis stolne. Say so still I bid thee (answered Bruno) and let all theworld beleeve thee, if they list to do so, for I will not. Wouldstthou (quoth Calandrino) have me damne my selfe to the divell? I seethou dost not credit what I say: but would I were hanged by the necke,if it be not true, that my Brawne is stolne. How can it possible be,replyed Bruno? Did not I see it in thy house yesternight? Wouldst thouhave me beleeve, that it is flowne away? Although it is not flowneaway (quoth Calandrino) yet I am certain, that it is stolne away:for which I am weary of my life, because I dare not go home to mineowne house, in regard my wife will never beleeve it; and yet if sheshould credite it, we are sure to have no peace for a twelve monthsspace.
5.  When the Feastivall was ended, she dwelling in the house of herFather, it was impossible for her to thinke on any thing else, butonely the love, which she had fixed on a person of such height. Andthat which most tormented her in this case, was the knowledge of herowne condition, being but meane and humble in degree; whereby sheconfessed, that she could not hope for any successefull issue of herproud love. Neverthelesse, she would not refraine from affecting theKing, who taking no note of this kindnesse in her, by anyperceivable meanes; must needs be the more regardles, which procured(by wary observation) her afflictions to be the greater andintollerable.
6.  Where Love presumeth into place:

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1.  Philostratus told not this Tale so covertly, concerning Lazarossimplicity, and Peronellaes witty policy; but the Ladies found aknot in the rush, and laughed not a little, at his queint manner ofdiscoursing it. But upon the conclusion, the King looking upon MadamEliza, willed her to succeede next, which as willingly she granted,and thus began. Pleasant Ladies, the charme or conjuration wherwithMadam Aemillia laid her night-walking Spirit, maketh me remember aNovell of another enchantment; which although it carrieth notcommendation equall to the other, yet I intend to report it, becauseit suteth with our present purpose, and I cannot sodainly befurnisht with another, answerable thereto in nature.
2.  Having thus consulted with her selfe, many desperate motionsentred her minde, to throw her selfe headlong from off the Tarras;till better thoughts wone possession of her soule. And the Sunne beingrisen, shee went to every corner of the Tarras, to espye any Ladcome abroad with his beasts, by whom she might send for herwaitingwoman. About this instant, the Scholler who lay sleeping (allthis while) under a bush, suddenly awaking; saw her looke over thewall, and she likewise espyed him; whereupon hee said unto her. Goodmorrow Madame Helena, What? are the Ladies come yet or no? Helenabearing his scorning question, and grieving that hee should sodelude her: in teares and lamentations, she intreated him to comeneere the Tower, because she desired to speake with him. Whichcourtesie he did not deny her, and she lying groveling upon herbrest on the Tarras, to hide her body that no part thereof might beseene, but her head; weeping, she spake thus to him.
3.  It is a commendable thing (faire Ladies) to hit a But that neverstirreth out of his place: but it is a matter much more admirable,to see a thing suddainely appearing, and sildome or never frequentedbefore, to bee as suddenly hit by an ordinary Archer. The viciousand polluted lives of Priests, yeeldeth matter of it selfe in manythings, deserving speech and reprehension, as a true But of wickednes,and well worthy to be sharply shot at. And therefore, though thathonest meaning man did wisely, in touching Master Inquisitor to thequicke, with the hypocriticall charity of Monkes and Friars, in givingsuch things to the poore, as were more meete for Swine, or to be worsethrowne away, yet I hold him more to be commended, who (by occasion ofa former tale, and which I purpose to relate) pleasantly reproovedMaster Can de la Scala, a Magnifico and mighty Lord, for a suddenand unaccustomed covetousnesse appearing in him, figuring by othermen, that which hee intended to say of him, in manner following.
4.  Thus leading him on, crying; Beware there before, and give way forGods sake, they arrived at the body of Saint Arriguo, that (by hishelpe) he might be healed. And while all eyes were diligentlyobserving, what miracle would be wrought on Martellino, he havingsitten a small space upon the Saints body, and being sufficientlyskilfull in counterfeiting, began first to extend forth the one of hisfingers, next his hand, then his arme, and so (by degrees) the rest ofhis body. Which when the people saw, they made such a wonderfull noysein praise of Saint Arriguo, even as if it had thundered in the Church.
5.   Worthy Ladies, it is a matter very manifest, that deceits do appeareso much the more pleasing, when (by the selfesame meanes) the subtledeceyver is artificially deceived. In which respect, though you allhave reported very singular deceits: yet I meane to tel you one,that may prove as pleasing to you, as any of your owne. And so muchthe rather, because the woman deceived, was a great and cunningMistris in beguiling others; equalling (if not excelling) any ofyour former beguilers.
6.  Thus a wanton-headed Lady, could finde no other subject to worke hermocking folly on, but a learned Scholler, of whom shee made no morerespect, then any other ordinary man. Never remembring, that suchmen are expert (I cannot say all, but the greater part of them) tohelpe the frenzie of foolish Ladies, that must injoy their loosedesires, by Negromancy, and the Divelles meanes. Let it therefore(faire Ladies) be my loving admonition to you, to detest all unwomanlymocking and scorning, but more especiallie to Schollers.

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1.  Justly deserve by death to be controld.
2.  In the Spring season, etc.
3.  As made the paine most pleasing, gracious,
4、  After he had thus discoursed with himselfe, remembring Sophronia,and converting his former allegations, into a quite contrarie sense,in utter detestation of them, and guided by his idle appetite, thus hebegan againe. The lawes of love are of greater force, then any otherwhatsoever, they not only breake the bands of friendship, but eventhose also of more divine consequence. How many times hath it binnoted, the father to affect his own daughter, the brother hissister, and the stepmother her son in law, matters far more monstrous,then to see one friend love the wife of another, a case happeningcontinually? Moreover, I am yong, and youth is wholly subjected to thepassions of Love: is it reasonable then, that those should be bardfrom me, which are fitting and pleasing to Love? Honest things, belongto men of more years and maturity, then I am troubled withall, and Ican covet none, but onely those wherein Love is directer. The beautyof Sophronia is worthy of generall love, and if I that am a yongman dolove her, what man living can justly reprove me for it? Shold not Ilove her, because she is affianced to Gisippus? That is no matter tome, I ought to love her, because she is a woman, and women werecreated for no other occasion, but to bee Loved. Fortune had sinned inthis case, and not I, in directing my frends affection to her,rather then any other; and if she ought to be loved, as herperfections do challenge, Gisippus understanding that I affect her,may be the better contented that it is I, rather then any other.
5、  This Sonne of mine Jeronimo, being as yet but foureteene years ofage, is so deeply enamoured of a yong Girle, named Silvestra, daughterunto a poore Tailor, our neere dwelling neighbour: that if we do notsend him out of her company, one day (perhaps) he may make her hiswife, and yet without any knowledge of ours, which questionlesse wouldbe my death. Otherwise, he may pine and consume himselfe away, if hesee us procure her marriage to some other. Wherefore, hold it good,that to avoid so great an inconvenience, we should send Jeronimosome far distance hence, to remaine where some of our Factors areemployed: because, when he shall be out of her sight, and theiroften meetings utterly disappointed; his affection to her will thesooner cease, by frustrating his hope for ever enjoying her, and so weshall have the better meanes, to match him with one of greaterquality. The Tutors did like well of her advice, not doubting but itwould take answerable effect: and therefore, calling Jeronimo into aprivate Parlor, one of them began in this manner.

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  • 孙宏阳 08-07

      Adriano (on the other side) perceiving how wisely the womanexcused her owne shame and her daughters; to backe her in abusinesse so cunningly begun, he called to Panuccio, saying. Havenot I tolde thee an hundred times, that thou art not fit to lye anywhere, out of thine owne lodging? What a shame is this baseimperfection to thee, by rising and walking thus in the night-time,according as thy dreames doe wantonly delude thee, and cause thee toforsake thy bed, telling nothing but lies and fables, yet avouchingthem for manifest truthes? Assuredly this will procure no meane perillunto thee: Come hither, and keepe in thine owne bedde for meere shame.

  • 唐庆明 08-07

      Wearisome is my life to me,

  • 钱伯斯 08-07

       Honourable Ladies, if with advised judgement, we do duly considerthe order of all things, we shall very easily perceyve, That the wholeuniversall multiplicitie of Women, by Nature, custome, and lawes,are and ought to be subject to men, yea, and to be governd by theirdiscretion. Because every one desiring to enjoy peace, repose andcomfort with them, under whose charge they are; ought to be humble,patient and obedient, over and beside her spotlesse honesty, whichis the crowne and honour of every good woman. And although thoselawes, which respect the common good of all things, or rather useand custome (as our wonted saying is) the powers wherof are verygreat, and worthy to be reverenced, should not make us wise in thiscase. Yet Nature hath given us a sufficient demonstration, in creatingour bodies more soft and delicate, yea, and our hearts timorous,fearefull, benigne and compassionable, our strength feeble, our voycespleasing, and the motion of our members sweetly plyant: all whichare apparant testimonies, that wee have neede of others government.

  • 袁心玥 08-07

      You may well imagine, this advise was not a little pleasing toTitus, wherupon Gisippus received home Sophronia into his house,with publike intention to make her his wife, according as was thecustome then observed, and Titus being perfectly recovered, waspresent at the Feast very ceremonially observed. When night wascome, the Ladies and Gentlewomen conducted Sophronia to theBride-Chamber, where they left her in her Husbands bed, and thendeparted all away. The Chamber wherein Titus used to lodge, joynedclose to that of Gisippus, for their easier accesse each to the other,at all times whensoever they pleased, and Gisippus being alone inthe Bride-Chamber, preparing as if he were comming to bed:extinguishing the light, he went softly to Titus, willing him to goeto bed to his wife. Which Titus hearing, overcome with shame andfeare, became repentant, and denyed to goe. But Gisippus, being a trueintyre friend indeed, and confirming his words with actions: after alittle lingring dispute, sent him to the Bride, and so soone as he wasin the bed with her, taking Sophronia gently by the hand, softly hemoved the usuall question to her, namely, if she were willing to behis wife.

  • 孙丽敏 08-06

    {  So, falling from one merry matter to another, yet without anymislike at all: the Gentlemen, having their horses prepared, and theirPortmantues fastened behind, drinking to their hoast, mounted onhorsebacke, and they roade away towards Florence, no lesse contentedwith the manner of occasions happened, then the effects they sortedto. Afterward, other courses were taken, for the continuance of thisbegun pleasure with Nicholetta, who made her mother beleeve, thatPanuccio did nothing else but dreame. And the mother her selferemembring how kindely Adriano had used her (a fortune not expected byher before:) was more then halfe of the minde, that she did thendreame also, while she was waking.

  • 盖伊·福克斯日 08-05

      It came to passe, that love over-awed him in such sort, as he fellinto a violent sicknesse, and store of Physicions were sent for, tosave him from death, if possibly it might be. Their judgementsobserving the course of his sicknesse, yet not reaching to the causeof the disease, made a doubtfull question of his recovery; which wasso displeasing to his parents, that their griefe and sorrow grewbeyond measure. Many earnest entreaties they moved to him, to know theoccasion of his sickenesse, whereto he returned no other answere,but heart-breaking sighes, and incessant teares, which drew him moreand more into weakenesse of body.}

  • 李国柱 08-05

      WHEREBY THAT LOVE (OFTENTIMES) MAKETH A MAN BOTH WISE AND

  • 凌志美 08-05

      MAKE NO PROMISE OF YEELDING TO ANY, UNDER A COMPACT OR

  • 章鲁生 08-04

       Calandrino became extraordinarily enamoured of a young Damosell,named Nicholetta. Bruno prepared a Charme or writing for him,avouching constantly to him, that so soone as he touched theDamosell therewith, she should follow him whithersoever hee would haveher. She being gone to an appointed place with him, hee was foundthere by his wife, and dealt withall according to his deserving.

  • 陈智敏 08-02

    {  THE INDUCTION TO THE SECOND DAY

  • 沃克 08-02

      Many additions more he made, concerning his faithfulnesse, truth,and integrity; so that, by the vehement asseveration of his words(whereto all the people there present gave credible beleefe) heprovoked them unto such zeale and earnest devotion; that the Sermonwas no sooner ended, but (in mighty crowds and throngs) they pressedabout the Biere, kissing his hands and feete, and all the garmentsabout him were torne in peeces, as precious Reliques of so holy aperson, and happy they thought themselves, that could get the smallestpeece or shred of any thing that came neere to his body: and thus theycontinued all the day, the body lying still open, to be visited inthis manner.

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